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Florida Tech Reviews

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3.8 out of 5
77 Reviews
Florida Tech
3.8 out of 5
77 Reviews
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Student & Graduate Reviews (77)

4 out of 5

I am currently slightly over halfway finished with my MBA at FIT. I have read through many of the negative reviews on the site and while I cannot speak for the experiences that other students have had, I can attest to the positive experience that I have had.

Let me first start out by saying that I went to a a major, very well known and nationally respected brick and mortar university for my undergraduate degree. I finished with a 3.75 GPA and had honors each semester in attendance. My point here is that I was not limited in choices for persuing my MBA. When it came time to choose which school to attend, I applied to, interviewed, and was accepted to a number of traditional MBA programs with the AACSB accredidation.

Unfortunately, none of these schools offer 100% online programs and all of them charge incredibly high tuition rates that will virtually assure the student debt for the next 10-15 years. Rather than stop working at a job I enjoy and racking up a tens of thousands of dollars in additional debt, I opted for a cheaper and more convenient program.

I will admit that I was nervous when I first began taking online MBA classes with FIT. I had concerns that the school was simply a "diploma mill" and that I wouldn't be challenged. Looking back, I couldn't have been more wrong. Florida Tech's program is both innovative and comprehensive and truly provides students with the skills necessary to become effective business leaders. As in any online class, the student is primarily responsible for teaching him or herself. However, I have yet to have an instructor that isn't more than willing to spend time talking via phone or email when a question arises. Likewise, the video lectures provide essentially the same experience that a student would get in a large lecture hall where the students are not given an opportunity to ask questions. Of course, as in any college FIT does have its problems. As an undergraduate at my traditional school, I had professors who should not have been professors. Likewise, I had classes with students who should have never been admitted to the college in the first place. These same issues will happen at FIT. In some classes that I have taken so far I have even seen students write papers without using capital letters or punctuation. Additionally, the books are very expensive and the high markup is obvious. However, I don't think that I ever walked into my undergraduate university bookstore and found a "cheap" textbook. At the end of the day, you are more than making up for the cost of the books in what you pay in tuition as compared to other programs. My point here is that one will likely experience many of the same difficulties in an online program that they would experience in a traditional program. As in any education program, however, the student must take some personal responsibility for the results. FIT instructors will not hold your hand or remind you when assignments are due. Likewise, unless you speak up they will assume that you understand the material and will not offer assistance. Because the program is online, students need to keep up with reading assignments and due dates. Those who do not will not be successful. Personally, I have found the coursework to be academically rigorous and on par with any traditional classroom program. The difference is, students are required to guide their own work as oppossed to the instructors. Unfortunately, we do still live in a society full of academic snobbery so which program one selects is also partly dependent upon where that person is in his or her life. If you are young, single, fresh out of college, and interested in making tons of money with a major investment firm, going to a top tier MBA program would most likely benefit you simply because of the name associated with that program. If, however, you have scheduling limitations or are interested more in promotional opportunities or simply knowledge, FIT will serve your purposes just fine. Keep in mind that FIT is fully accredited by the same association that accredits such schools as Georgia Tech and University of Miami. The school has a physical campus and offers the same graduate programs there as it does online. My point in this rant is not to provide free promotion for FIT but to help those who may be struggling to make an informed decision. Please don't be swayed by those who are either too arrogant to admit that a school that hasn't been around for 200 is just as good academically or those who failed to make the personal sacrifices necessary to succeed in the program and failed. If you are looking for a solid, well-priced, rigorous, and convevient program, give FIT a try.

4 out of 5

This school is only there to get the financial aid money. Classes are about 2,500 and are basically powerpoint slides from the book itself. The professor in the lectures pretty much read stuff from the book and nothing more. I was surprised to find that I owed over 600 dollars and that they couldn't work out a payment plan. I wasn't even aware because what the school likes to do is send information to the spam so that you won't see it.

After three classes and over 10,000 that this school, got from me. I quit this for profit school and will go back to the tradional school. At least I know that I'm getting true cost value instead of making those professor there and deans richer. The overall experience was completely worthless and a waste of 10,000 dollars for three classes.

4 out of 5

I'm half way through my MBA coursework and am finding it to be very worthwhile. Don't get me wrong working full time and taking classes in the evenings is hard, but it's great that you can log in whenever you want to complete your work. I've had some weeks where I was able to devote two hours a night to the course work, but then other weeks where I was busy, but able to work on it for a longer period of time over the weekend.

The coursework is pretty much self taught through reading the book, watching video lectures of the professors, and doing assignments/tests. There is some interaction with students in doing group assignments and online discussion boards.

It is hard work, but well worth the reward of getting an MBA from a "traditional" university. This is not a for profit institute that your future employer will look down upon. And yes employers do look at University of Phoenix degrees less than they do a "traditional" school.

The other great thing about this school versus other online schools is you get to walk with your online and campus class on the campus in Melbourne, FL if you so desire.

I would highly recommend this school to anyone looking for the flexibility of an online school, but the standards of a true regionally accredited normal university.

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4 out of 5

I've read the negative reviews on this site, and from what I can tell, most of them are due to the "student" not being responsible enought to follow up. If you send textbooks back, then make sure you get a confirmation of receipt from the postal service or fedex/ups. Keep your documentation, and call your rep to make sure they were recieved. If they confirm with you over the phone, the call is recorded.

I am in my second semester of the CIS program and I am completely satisfied. I was a little hesitant at first becuase the enrollment process seemed pushy and the financial aspect of it was overwhelming. My student representative was more than helpful in answering all of my questions accurately and definatively. The financial aid process is slow, so make sure you take the appropriate steps to ensure the paperwork is correct.

The process of enrollment is also YOUR RESPONSIBILITY and you have the RIGHT to make sure everything is as it should be before making a commitment. The only contracts you enter are the ones for the classes, which you are able to drop the class and receive a refund before the end of the first week. The fees and fines that are described in other complaints occur at other colleges as well! I've gotten degrees from two other schools and they both had similar fees for late registration and dropping a class after a set deadline.

The classes are challenging, and there is a lot of reading involved. If your looking to pay for a degree to be handed to you, guess what, you don't deserve it. College is all about hard work and perserverence. If it were that easy, wouldn't everyone do it?

4 out of 5

I have been an FIT student since Jan 2009. Working full-time and raising a family isn't an easy task in general. Now add on college to complete the degree that you have sought after for many years.

When I was looking for a college to attend I came across University Alliance, who represents many colleges in Florida. FIT (Florida Institute of Technology) caught my eye and I am proud to say I absolutely love this college. FIT is a private college online and YES A REAL COLLEGE!! FIT is located in Melbourne, FLorida and I have frequented the campus as my son enrolled there this past Spring. I, on the other hand, am an FIT student online and am proud to say have a little over year until I have my bachelor's degree. The best thing is when I graduate I will graduate with the class. No mail diploma I will get to do something I have dreamed of my entire life.

Is the homework and reading intense? Yes most definitely. It's all about sacrifice and changing your lifestyle which includes a lot of self dicipline. The teachers are great. Look at the class rooster, it gives you who they are and where they have been and accomplished, and many are very accomplished.

As for the classes themselves, the books and information provided are very useful and current. Some include MyMathLab or MyAccountingLab from Pearson, which can excellent learning tools for comprehension. The teachers for the most part are awesome, like any college, sometimes you get teachers which seem to be more of proctors, but actually are wanting you to formulate your own ideas and concepts and understanding through your work.

Trust me, I work my rear off in 2 full-time 8 week classes doing homework and assignments, midterms finals, juggling my job and family all at the same time; so dedication is defnitely a must especially if you want to do well.

The curriculum is just as difficult as being in class, and in a sense harder than the private college I attended years ago in PA.

So far I find my experience here to be exciting and challenging! I work hard for my grades and so far am doing very well (GPA 3.69). The teachers are fair, my advisor through University Alliance/FIT is awesome and I receive my books with no problems.

4 out of 5

I am entering my 2nd year at Florida Tech and I love this school. My experience has been everything I expected it to be. Has everything been peachy and perfect? Ofcourse not, there were bumps in the road, professors I liked and didn't like, etc... but seriously, that's the case with ANY school.

Florida Tech is NOT a diploma mill, that's the first thing I researched on before I enrolled. Florida Tech is a REGIONALLY accreditted school by a LEGIT accrediting agency by the dept. of education. Many, many, many OTHER SCHOOLS are NATIONALLY accreditted. There's a HUGE difference in what that means. Typically, nationally accreditted schools are the diploma mills, their standards are not what they should be and their accrediation is NOT legit.

Although I have had a negative experience in ONE of my classes with the professor, I followed through the "chain of command" if you will and stayed on it until it was resolved. As adults we can't go blaming every little thing on the school... NOWHERE is gonna be problem and error free. It's what you make of it. If you can't work independently for the most part, you don't belong at any online school.

Also each class is going to be different. I've had classes that the professor doesn't interact much and I've also had others where I can call my professor, have live chats, email anytime and get a response asap... it just depends who you get. This is NO different than a brick and mortar school.

4 out of 5

I've spent two years in an undergraduate program at FIT. One of the problems with the online classes is that your assigned professor is essentially a study hall monitor. Don't get me wrong, I've had some really good professors that were excited about their subjects. They simply have very little control over the class. Not only do they not do the lectures, they don't prepare the tests.

The work load is not conducive to a full time job, which is the main reason most people choose to go online. There is a very high rate of dropping out of classes. If you are single and have a lot of free time, go for it. If you have children, please don't. The math and accounting classes especially, have a ridiculous amount of homework (college algebra required 142 homework problems in one week-all done in their online lab and each taking anywhere from five minutes to twenty, depending on the steps required to solve the problem). You only get two breaks a year, three weeks at Christmas, and one week between Summer 1 and Summer 2.

I'm not sure if this is only FIT or the entire University Alliance. Maybe the whole system needs a little overhauling.

4 out of 5

I am a current student working towards a bachelor's degree and am very satisfied with my experience. The financial aid department is a bit slow, but seriously it is a great school! Did someone say that all of the students get A's? What classes did you take? Cause that is not the case. The courses are hard, just like a brick and mortar campus. You work for your grades. Sure they start out easy, I was pulling a 4.0 the first 3 terms.

Then I started the courses directly for my major. This is not a degree mill. If you don't put in the effort, you will get a horrible grade. If you have a problem spending the money on books or with your advisor, ask for another one. There was a post on this board of someone that was "forced" to purchase a book. He stated that the advisor's supervisor was not in the office when he called. Did you call more than once? Sounds like you didn't. It's easy to label things as a scam when you refuse to put effort into anything.

Remember- The major plus about this school over the other online schools is that it is accredited by the US Department of Education. Try looking up the other online schools and see what you get. If you are looking to spend thousands of dollars on a piece of paper that is only worth wiping you butt with, then by all means go to the University of Phoenix. If you want a degree that is recognized nationally by a federal agency, then stick with FIT.

4 out of 5

I am currently a student at Florida Tech online doing the MBA program. I have finished 6 courses so far out of the 12 required for the MBA from Florida Tech online. People have alot of questions regarding if it is easy.

Is it easy. No. What do you have to do. You have to take exams usually 3 or 4 per course. Write papers and do research on different topics. You also have to do homework problems. You have to actively participate in dicussion assignments. Aside from this you might even have to do group assignments or different projects which require researching a company or doing research on a particular subject.

Lot of students drop out of the class within the first two weeks usually after the first exam. I was in a class where 6 or 7 students dropped out after the first 2 weeks of class. thats around 35 percent of the students rougly who dropped out within the first 2 weeks. We are given class details regarding the mean median and mode as well as the highest and lowest grades for each assignment and exam.

Most people dont do well on the exam usually. For instance the class I just finshed had a class average for the first exam of 50 percent. The highest grade for that exam was 90 percent. It was a finance class and we had a CFO from GE in the class with like 20 plus years of experince so I guess he got the 90 percent. The exams are not easy.

Ofcourse the exam average went up after the first exam because lot of people dropped out though the exam average for the last exam of the class was around 70 percent. So the exams are not easy at all. If we just went by the exams and no one was allowed to drop the class then I am guessing that the average class grades would be very low and at least more than half would probably not even pass the course.

This does not happen ofcourse because lot of people who dont do well in the first exam quickly drop out of the course. Second the grading for the discussions and other assignments varies from professor to professor. Some professors are very tough on the assignments you do while others are easier with their grading of the assginments.

The only part of the course which I feel is relatively graded easily is the discussion assignments though again this will vary from professor to professor though people do better on the discussion assignments than on the exam.

If we went by the disscussion assignments most people would get an A though the discussion assignments only make up like 20 percent of the grade usually so dont get too excited. I think the discussion assignments are more focused on participation. Though some professors are very tough grading those assginments too.

Here is my break down of the grading and the amount of work required for each aspect of the class. Keep in mind this usually varies from professor to professor though this is just the trend I have seen so far.

Exams: HARD require alot of work

Disscussion Assignments: EASY require decent amount of work

Papers and projects: MODERATE require a lot of work

Homework assignments: MODERATE require decent amount of work

Other Projects: HARD to MODERATE require working toghter as teams and do require alot of work

Some aspects of the class might be easy though you still have to do alot of work for those parts of the class. It is just that they require lot of time. It is very time consuming and you should give yourself at least 15 to 20 hours a week. If you have that much time and are of decent intelligence you are going to get an A or B most likely or at least most of the times.

4 out of 5

I'm totally satisfied with the education I've been receiving through Florida Tech. I wish I could attend a public university in person, but I'm studying at my own pace, fitting it in between my current challenging work and home schedules. My opinion is highly favorable thus far. This is NOT a degree mill.

I have been enrolled in the graduate business program at Florida Tech since December of '09. I had to go completely online with my studies because of my awkward work schedule and the fact I have two children. I am finishing my third class now--Managerial Economics--and it's not been a cakewalk by any means, but I got a lot out of it, primarily because I study hard and committed myself to doing well in school, making my investment worthwhile.

I've read plenty of negative reviews about this school, and it's a shame those people feel jilted, but I don't believe it's a scam. A business, definitely, but not a scam. Yes, it's a bit expensive, but that's what you get with a private institution. I could have enrolled at the University of South Florida or Florida, but those are blended programs that require weekend attendance. I work weekends.

If you think about it, Florida Tech utilizes the University Alliance, run by Bisk Education...which was founded by Nathan M. Bisk, the person whose name is branded to the Florida Institute of Technology College of Business.

The texts they sell are the same ones used by other schools around the country. A little expensive, yes, but you are paying for convenience. Someone's doing the shopping for you and they have to pay to store the books, have a person to ship them, and to ship via FedEx. All of my course materials have arrived about four weeks prior to the start of that class.

All universities and educational institutions have dud instructors. I had plenty of them as an undergraduate years ago in another state. My first class with FL Tech had an instructor who was slow to respond to my requests and she did not participate in online discussions, but the two courses that followed had professors who were immersed and engaged. They responded to my emails and participated in the discussion boards.

My last class, Managerial Economics, had a fantastic professor. He pointed us to outside tutorial resources in addition to the discussion boards, the pre-recorded studio lectures, and the book readings...and homework. All of it helped me absorb the information. I had encouragement when I discovered I was having trouble and my homework came back to me with comments in red to help me better understand what I had done incorrectly.

People need to know they are responsible for the outcomes of their education and online learning requires discipline. Perhaps those disgruntled posters should do a better job at doing their homework, so to speak, prior to enrollment. I spent a considerable amount of time looking in to other alternatives. I sought information from Florida State, UF, USF, Arizona State and even my alma mater, Bowling Green State University. None of them were going to work for me because of my work schedule. One of the most useful discoveries I made while interviewing with these schools concerns accreditation.

Florida Tech's College of Business IS accredited. In fact, the university itself is aligned with all those major schools I just listed. The difference in accreditation lies within the College of Business. Each separate college or department of a university receives accreditation that states the school meets a fairly high standard for teaching in that area.

Florida Tech is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), where you will find such schools as Florida State, University of Miami, University of South Florida, Georgia Tech, Louisiana State, and many more major schools from North Carolina to Texas.

Here's where it gets confusing for some. The Florida Tech College of Business has a REGIONAL accreditation from the SACS (mentioned above), but it does not yet have INTERNATIONAL accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). What's the difference? An international accreditation means your credits are more likely to transfer and your education MAY carry a little more gravitas on the job market. The AACSB accreditation is difficult to achieve and claims only 25% of the business schools in the U.S. achieve this accreditation. Florida Tech is not on this list.

When I was interviewing with USF's College of Business, I was warned that my Florida Tech credits would not transfer over since they did not have AACSB accreditation. I understood the consequences in advance, but chose to continue with Florida Tech because to educate myself at 48 years old was more important to me than waiting for who-knows-how-long before I could make a move and attend a bigger business school. For me time is valuable and I can't afford to waste it simply waiting for things to change.

This does not mean that an education from Florida Tech is any less worthy than an education at UF, for example. It's what you do with the knowledge given. I honestly do question how some of the people that have been in my class will fare in the real world. And I wonder how they got in to a master's level program with such poor grammar and writing abilities.

Some of the postings have been laughable. I have no idea if those people have been excised or graded for their poor performance, but that is not my concern. I am focused on absorbing my education and making the most of the opportunities I have before me.

I hope this helps you make a decision on whether or not the Florida Institute of Technology is right for you.

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