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University of Nevada - Reno Reviews

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Student & Graduate Reviews (13)

5 out of 5
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2008

I found my college to be a good learning environment to improve my computer science skills. The faculty were very cooperative and the students were passionate for an education in their desired fields.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Criminal Justice
Graduation Year: 2017

I decided to go back to school once again. I completed the online Masters of Criminal Justice through Boston University (BU) in 2009 but I wanted some management courses which my previous program lacked. I found the Masters of Justice Management program at University of Nevada - Reno (UNR). I will complete the program in Fall 2017. The initial enrollment of this program at UNR was much more personal than BU. The email link on the UNR website is actually for the Assistant Director of the program. She was very responsive over email and phone. She helped me tremendously as the Federal Government was initiating new online school program requirements. Basically, if you were an "out-of-state" student in an online program, the two states had to have some educational reciprocity. Not sure how that makes sense, but that is Government. Huge thumbs up on the enrollment and information gathering process at UNR. The UNR Masters of Justice Management offers a lot more courses than my BU program did, and this excited me. The UNR program offers concentrations in Juvenile Justice Management, Adult Justice Management, and Courtroom Management, or like me you can generalize. The amount of courses offered is very nice and add a lot of depth to the program. The student has a fair amount to choose from. The course presentations and professor interaction is not great. The courses are not taught by UNR faculty, but by working professionals. Each working professional is very accomplished, by none of them are teachers. The courses that I have take thus far do not offer any video recorded lectures, audio recorded lectures, or PowerPoint presentations. I say none, though a couple of courses did have presentations of sorts, but nothing substantial at all, nor were the presentations consistent throughout. The courses heavily rely on student participation to facilitated dialogue and thought. Most teachers do not interact with the students in the weekly forums and I have not received substantial feedback on the majority of my assignments. This program has disappointed me. I was excited to see the variety of courses; excited that it was a management program; excited that the program would not break the bank, and excited about the initial contact with the Assistant Director. However, coming to an end in the program, I am very disappointed with the quality of the teachers and the structure of the courses. The UNR is very much a self taught program, where the BU program was heavily involved and attributed to by the professor.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Information Systems
Graduation Year: 2015

I graduated earlier this year and, looking back, UNR was a bit of a mixed bag for. The big pro with UNR was, for an out of state school, the tuition was cheaper (should you have the WUE and/or financial aid), and the rent was very cheap. Being from Northern California and living in the same city my whole life, I wanted to go somewhere that was far enough away from home that I felt independent, but not so far that I could just drive the 4 hours it takes to get back home. UNR was the perfect distance and it didn't break the bank to go there. As a result, I never took out any student loans and I graduated with no student debt. The campus is beautiful, with a lot of newer buildings being built over the last few years, to go along with a beautiful quad that would make you think you're on an Ivy League campus. Classes are tough, but the cool thing was they encouraged us to go get help should there be problems. From instructor office hours to supplemental instructions, they all helped me get through in one way or another. Professors are either really good or really bad, but, overall, I never had any real problems with any professor. The biggest problem for me was social (off campus) life. It took me a while to be comfortable with my new surroundings, since I am a very shy person to begin with. However, I fell behind very quickly, and didn't have the social life I envisioned before coming here. Even so, I wasn't a big party animal, so, if you don't party or socialize a lot, it can be rough. So make sure to get involved with people right away. There are fraternities and sororities for Greek life, clubs on campus, the Lombardi Center to workout, and so on. Downtown Reno has stuff going going on at hotels (i.e. Grand Sierra Resort, Peppermint, etc.), the RiverWalk and concert halls (i.e. Knitting Factory), as well as plenty of bars to go to (recommend Ceol Irish Pub if you like Guiness). Other than that, there isn't a whole lot going on, unless you stay for a summer class, when there will be more festivals going on outside. The biggest draw for me was Lake Tahoe, where I could go skiing during the winter whenever I wanted. The problem was that the resorts had the worst snow in their history during my four years there, but it hopefully should improve this year. However, even on days with enough snow, I was so overworked with assignments and projects going on that I only went just enough to justify the price I paid for getting a Season Pass. So make sure you want to ski a lot. Otherwise, you're wasting a few hundred dollars. Speaking of which, the weather in Reno is very unpredictable. The weather is nicest from the beginning of the fall semester (mid to late August) to the end of September. From there, it will gradually get colder and, occasionally, we will get snow by the end of the fall semester. However, one year, we had spring like weather in January and, on one particular day, it went from sunny to cloudy to windy to rainy to hailing to clear all within six hours. So be ready for anything. Overall, it was a good school to go to, but if you ask me if I would go back to school there, evaluate all of your options first before making your decision. If you do end up going, you'll have a great time if you meet people right away.

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4 out of 5
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Degree: Elementary Education
Graduation Year: 2008

The College of Education at UNR was very beneficial in preparing me for my career. Including many practicums and practicing and working with real teachers, getting to work with real schools and make real lesson plans limited the shock of running my own classroom. Be wary about the counselors though. Because of some misguidance, I did not finish my undergraduate as planned and had to complete my student teaching a semester after all of my colleagues finished.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Economics
Graduation Year: 2012

UNR has a wonderful library. It is a school that can give you a great education if you seek it out and work hard.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration, Management and Operations, Other
Graduation Year: 2011

Definitely a challenge. Don't work more than 20 hours a week and live on campus. Commuter students don't get the experience. Stand up for yourself and try and get an internship.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration and Management, General
Graduation Year: 2015

University of Nevada was an excellent institution for my B.S. He teachers were thorough and showed clear passion for their subject matter. The classes tended to be crowded, a result of a quickly growing area and a campus working to accommodate everyone who wants the opportunity for an advanced education. The campy is beautiful. Resources are abundant and scholarships are awarded for academic achievement. There are several hundred clubs and orgs to enhance your experience. Overall, a fantastic experience.

3 out of 5
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Degree: History
Graduation Year: 2011

College is a great place to be challenged and have an opportunity to learn things that you WANT to learn. I gained a love for learning in College. However, without a clear goal in mind I spent a lot of time going in different directions and changed my major 5 times before I decided to just finish a degree. I don't use my degree specifically in my career, but I do use skills that I honed during my college years.

5 out of 5
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Degree: History
Graduation Year: 2014

UNR is a energetic school transitioning into being a research location. There are a lot of opportunities for internships and exploring new ideas as the school grows and expands. Their faculty is grounded and helpful, especially in the History Department. The facilities are beautiful, and the city is very welcoming of college students. It is the perfect combination of a hardcore learning environment and a fun college town.

5 out of 5
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Degree: History
Graduation Year: 2014

UNR is a energetic school transitioning into being a research location. There are a lot of opportunities for internships and exploring new ideas as the school grows and expands. Their faculty is grounded and helpful, especially in the History Department. The facilities are beautiful, and the city is very welcoming of college students. It is the perfect combination of a hardcore learning environment and a fun college town.

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