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University of Phoenix Reviews

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3.6 out of 5
979 Reviews
University of Phoenix
3.6 out of 5
979 Reviews
60%
Recommend This School
61%
Degree Improved Career
5 stars
(179)
4 stars
(540)
3 stars
(59)
2 stars
(94)
1 star
(108)

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Student & Graduate Reviews (979)

1 out of 5
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Degree: Human Services, General
Graduation Year: 2016

I would not refer this school to anyone! I now owe a balance that I don't have because my advisors could not do their jobs. No one was ever on the same page! I was told countless lies, calls never returned along with not retiring emails. I am very upset because I am 4 classes away from a degree! Which can't be finished until I pay them almost $500! I'm a new mother! I don't have that kind of money. I can't even attend other schools while paying that off.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Environmental Science
Graduation Year: 2016

As a Ph.D. geologist myself, I made the mistake of thinking that I could learn something by taking an online Environmental Law class at the University of Phoenix. The class was taught by a former high school teacher who literally could not write a coherent sentence.The University of Phoenix is a diploma mill that needs to be shut down in order to protect veterans and low-income students.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2016

I am a veteran and this is a predatory school. They tell you all kinds of great stories to get you in then once you are in they could care less. I dropped an online class within the first week and because I posted 3 times ,that were marked unsubstantiated by the way, I now owe them over $400.00. They have severely messed up my Post 9/11 GI Bill because they keep sending in amendment after amendment even after I left the school. I may not be able to finish my degree because my benefits might be depleted thanks to their should be illegal acts. I plan to contact the BBB and whatever other institutions that I can to make it known that this "university" is below standard. The learning environment is horrible. The "instructors" are hardly ever reachable and when you do reach them they treat you as if you are sub par and could care less about you. Avoid this very expensive predatory school at all cost.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Healthcare Administration
Graduation Year: 2016

I attended University of Phoenix seeking a degree in the Bachelor program. I read some of the reviews and one individual commented that they have yet to use their degree. No college can guarantee you a job, and it is up to the individual to ensure that they go out and find a job. UOP is not a bad school, their work is challenging and will prepare you for a job in your profession. Although, I have to agree that I do not approve of the learning team because it is a hassle of trying to get everyone on the same page when they live in different time zone. However, being on teams can be beneficial when the paper distributed among several students, but sometimes you end of doing more than expected.

5 out of 5
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Degree: MBA
Graduation Year: 2013

I attend UOPX in 2003 and have since earned three degrees. My degrees have landed me employment with a replicable organization. I have earn more income than ever before and I have great knowledge of the profession. I am please to say I greatly appreciate my education from Phoenix and would be more than ecstatic to refer others to the University. I recommend that individuals seeking a costly (financially and timely) adventure such as college, should do research and follow their hearts. Needless to say, I know individuals who attend brick and mortar colleges are unemployed and have been since graduation. Blessings as you travel on your journey!

5 out of 5
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Degree: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2012

Working with the groups provides a forum that mirrors a work environment. I find it interesting that some reviews comment that some students don't participate and they have to pick up the slack. This should be a learning experience as a leader. It is apparent that these individuals are not leaders and prefer to blame others. I worked very hard and believe the experience has changed my life for the better.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Education
Graduation Year: 2017

So I spent six months looking at schools both online and brick and morter. I have three children and I work as a substitute teacher nearly full time. I needed a school that would teach me what I wanted to know, and that would further my career as a teacher, without requiring me to spend all my time on campus. This school is regionally accredited and has contacts in my state to let me do my student teaching. I am about a third of the way done with my program and have had little to no trouble completing my classes. This isn't to say that they are easy. On the contrary, these classes are challenging. However, I wouldn't want it any other way. If I can't get ahold of somebody quickly through email, such as one lady complained about, then I just call. If I don't reach my person, I still can get help immediately. My local district is already talking about where they would like me to work when I finish my degree. I pretty much have a guaranteed job, which is partially because I am a substitute for the district, and partially because they are pleased I am working on completing my degree. I would recommend this school to those who have busy lives and still want to get a degree. You may run into a few students who really don't care early in your program, but a little ways in, these have been weeded out and you only end up working with serious students.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, General
Graduation Year: 2016

I have to start off by saying that any review you read make sure you are reading in detail their problem. Could the problem have been avoided by the student? What could the student/teacher done to correct it? Could the student have done more on their part? These questions need to be answered in order to for the review to be effective when there are negative reviews. I have had a near perfect experience with this university. I have not had any problems with my classes being scheduled or with professors. Some professors were harder than others but that is at any college. I ran into one issue with financial aid after the university scheduled my class to start 2 weeks after my last class ended. Financial aid called me and said my classes would be dropped because I had not been active for 2 weeks. I informed them t was because my classes were scheduled two weeks apart. I was informed in the future to sign a leave of absence for those two weeks so I would not be in fear of having my financial aid dropped. I also think financial aid needs to create a medium between them and academics so students will not get their classes dropped on behalf of the university's doing. Other than that everything has been wonderful. I have honestly learned a lot and have become more focused and disciplined through these rigorous online classes.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology
Graduation Year: 2016

Don't go to the University of Phoenix. If you are a good student you will have to do group assignments with truly mental students. The staff will not care if you are unhappy with a professor or are being bullied by other students. They will care when you need to pay them money. If you are stupid and want to buy a diploma, go to the University of Phoenix. I have quit the University of Phoenix and I am about to start at another university.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration, Management and Operations, Other
Graduation Year: 2017

I'm currently carrying a 3.79 GPA, studying for my BS in Business Management with a certificate in Advanced Software Development. My experience falls along the lines of I get out of this school what I put into it, and I'm already getting paid even though I graduate in 2017 (more on that in a moment). I went to a prestigious university right after high school, but I didn't take it seriously. I ended up losing my financial aid at the time because my GPA dipped below 2.0. I also got into some legal trouble, but despite my personal struggles, I managed to build a solid career in IT, and ran my own business until I lost it all in the recession. Long story short, I'm getting back to where I was, and I started another business. Over 20 years later, I decided to go back to get my degree, but I didn't have time to go to a traditional school. I decided on UoPX because one of my closest friends got his degree there several years earlier. He's currently doing very well as a senior analyst for a large health services organization, he's paid off his student loans, and his degree has opened many doors for him. Personally, I decided to get my degree as an example to my two young sons. I couldn't very well stress the value of a college education to them if I didn't have one, especially when I had done very well without it. The online classes fit easily into my work and home schedule, and I've learned a lot from the materials. I had good instructors and bad instructors at my last 4 -year university, and I've had good and bad instructors at Phoenix. Just like at the 4-year university, I could tell which ones actually cared, which ones didn't, and which ones are competent. I took classes that were a joke at the 4-year university, and I took classes that took every ounce of effort just to get a C. At Phoenix, I characterize the classes here as somewhere between easy and tedious. The classes that have challenged me simply had a lot of assignments due, and I simply did not have enough time in my schedule to get all of the work done. The group assignments pose a challenge to coordinate everyone's schedule to complete the work online. All of my groups, though, have had serious students, so I've never had a problem with flakes. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that I transferred in with a lot of units, so I've taken mostly core and upper division classes. Perhaps the less serious students have already been weeded out by this time? Phoenix does let new students take classes on a trial basis. Again, this was my experience 20 years ago going to one of the best colleges in my state; some students simply did not care and let others shoulder the load in group assignments. The academic and financial advisors have been very diligent in checking in with me. I hear from someone at least monthly, and every time I call, I get assistance. In fact, I was studying for my Project Management Certificate, and I changed my mind and wanted to take software programming. My advisor got approval for me to get an ASD Certificate outside of the School of Business. The reason I did this is because I stumbled upon a situation after I finished my last Accounting class. A business owner hired me to straighten his books out. After that project, I've been advertising myself for part-time bookkeeping services, which does not require any degree, credential, or certification. I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon with a second potential client. I used what I learned, so now I'm making a little extra money on the side. With each programming class I complete, I have the chance to compete for more software programming contracts for my consulting business. I know so many people with 4 year degrees who don't even use them. My ex-wife has a degree from a traditional 4-year university. Because she stayed at home during our marriage and doesn't have recent job experience, she can't find a job that pays more than $12/hour (hard to live on in California). I know so many more people without college degrees who make six figures and up. Many years ago, the MCSE in IT was considered a joke certification, but now many IT jobs require it. I've sat on interview panels, and seen people get passed over with degrees and certifications but no experience. A degree does not guarantee a job, especially without the relevant experience, but it can open doors for someone who's paying attention. I recommend to anyone considering Phoenix, that before attending Phoenix, get all the lower division classes done at a community college first, if there is one in the area. First, it's cheaper; why pay $410 a unit for basic Math and English classes? Community colleges in California charge $50 a unit (I believe, but don't quote me), and students can still get financial aid there. Second, life happens. Kids get sick, jobs get crazy, cars break down, relatives die. If life gets in the way and you need to take a leave, better to do so with only a few hundred or maybe a thousand dollar student loan debt than $15,000. I agree with others here who have said it's not for everyone. 5 week classes and the online format takes a little getting used to. I learn by doing and watching, so the interactive tutorials and videos help me the best. I don't learn by listening, so I don't get much sitting in a classroom listening to a lecture. Also, if I have issues, I talk to my instructor. If my instructor doesn't help, I call my academic advisor. If I still don't get help, I go up the chain until someone does. Hey, I'm paying $15 grand a year, and it's my education. Now that the Feds have cracked down on for-profit colleges, I expect many more people to have the same experience I'm having. In fact, it may even be worth it to put less weight on any comments (positive or negative) from people who attended Phoenix prior to 2015. Lastly, I haven't had any negative feedback so far about attending Phoenix. Colleagues and clients have reacted positively, and no one has said anything about it being a worthless degree or diploma mill. In fact, I've already gotten paying work and I haven't even graduated. I will say that having sat on interview panels, I've seen more than my fair share of terrible resumes. I've seen resumes from Stanford graduates that seemed like a third grader wrote it. Needless to say, they didn't get hired. It may not be the Phoenix degree holding someone back. Just saying.

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