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University of Phoenix Reviews

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Student & Graduate Reviews (1,038)

4 out of 5
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I think when you go to online studying, the most important part of your experience is yourself. What I am saying is that a great part of your success depends on you and your own motivation to effectively complete the program. I am just completing the management associates degree (Axia college of University of Phoenix) and enrolling into the psychology bachelor's degree program. It has been quite a challenge, specially because usually when you enroll at online programs like these is because you are occupied with other activities such as a regular job. So far, all my professors have had a great curriculum, very unbiased (important) and supportive. I recommend it.

4 out of 5
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I also attended UOP for three classes toward my MBA. I found the classes to be extremely informative and the instructors to be knowledgeable in their prospective fields. I didn't run into the grammar/spelling issues that were mentioned previously, but maybe that's because these are higher-level classes. I didn't finish through them, but that's only because I decided if I was going to spend money and time on a higher-level degree, I want it in something I love, which they can't offer me. I wouldn't think twice about going back there to finish the MBA, though, if that's the degree I wanted. I'd re-enroll for that in a heartbeat! I really thought it was a great program.

4 out of 5
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OK. Online schools get beaten up, but no school is easy. UOP might be a lot of things, but it requires busy working adults to dedicate to a program and successfully complete it. In my experience, that's all employers are really looking for. Who really cares where the degree's from as long as it is accredited. Without such schools, many adults would not have the opportunity to wrap up a degree they worked on earlier in life. I graduated from UOP by attending their brick-and-morter school (not online). I recommend others considering UOP to do the same. It's a better overall experience. And, for what it's worth to the snobs out there, more desirable to employers because of its more traditional format. Another recommendation: get your undergrad from UOP and get a master's at a traditional college. Nobody will care where you got you undergrad from.

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4 out of 5
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I find that the distance learning program with University of Phoenix is a great program.

I am a single mother and I work full-time and find that this was the only option I had to get a higher education. The classes are not bad at all and I find that the students are helpful too. I have always wanted to go back to college and I think this was the best way. Even though they are a little pricey, you do get what you pay for. The ability to work at my own pace and understand the work, yet have the deadlines for homework works well for me.

I have checked out other online colleges but they were very pushy and a typical sales person. When I was put in contact with a representative he was amazing. He told me about the school and he explained everything thoroughly to me. I had not made a decision right then and there and I eventually contacted him a few days later to go ahead. He helped me a lot through the first 3-4 months of school and then I was put in contact with my own Academic Advisor who has since been great too. I'll be sad to lose him once I go to my Bachelor's Degree program. But I have done distance learning with high school before so this was easy for me.

You do have to have the motivation and have to self motivate yourself and the dedication to do something like this. It is not for everyone as I work with people who have tried this and it does not work for them. Everyone's learning curve and how they learn is different. I couldn't be happier with University of Phoenix and I can't wait to start my Bachelor's Degree!! =)

4 out of 5
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I received my Bachelor of Science degree in Information Technology in May of 07. The course work was demanding in conjunction with the fastidious and capricious nature identified with military life, I found the program a bit challenging. I have to agree with one poster when he or she elaborated on the quality of students. These are so-called professionals who hold prominent positions but yet appear to function at a 10th or 11th grade level. I have come across a lot of students who could not spell and who used poor grammar. I spent many of time correcting errors on other students than my own individual projects. I am not perfect by any means. However, UoP should conduct placement tests for reading and writing comprehension. After all, when it comes down to it, you have to count on these people to make the grade.

4 out of 5
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I just started taking courses at UOP and the experience is by far more beneficial to me than my experiences with attending a traditional college. The "team" work that the the person complained about is a very valuable experience. That person must not be very experienced in life because any one who has working experience can tell you that when you work for an employeror or are the employer of others, you are on a team and it is imperative to your career that you not only have strong individual skills but that you also know how to function efficiently with others to accomplish goals. At UOP, every week both a team project and an individual project is due. If you are mature you will pull your own weight and not bring others down because of a negative attitude as the writer that I am referring to clearly exhibits. UOP is for real adults who don't have time to play...we are serious about our careers.

4 out of 5
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I liked the online learning format because I worked FT when I was getting my degree and didn't have to worry about attending classes at night or working classes in around my work schedule. I liked the fact that I could complete my assignments when I was able to - it might be at 6am or 10pm. I could take as many classes or as little as one class and still be considered a student in a degree program. I also liked the summer classes that were fast track (3 weeks in length). I just think the online degree offered so much flexibility. I liked the school because the advisors were very proactive. If you had a questions or needed assistance an advisor would call you within a day at home or at work. The instructors were also very helpful and readily available. If you needed something you could e-mail the professor and get an answer within a few hours. I think I would improve the way that the syllabus is set up for some classes that I took. When I start a class I like the syllabus to be laid out for the entire course so I can plan accordingly. In some classes, it was only a 2-3 week plan.

4 out of 5
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Having attended both conventional schools and distance learning, I can say that online is more difficult and requires more discipline.

The classes are five weeks long, but they cram 16 weeks of learning into that time. Students were required to write at least two papers each week, one on your own and the other as part of a team. That's where the problems came in.

Students are not permitted to choose their teammates. They are, instead, assigned by the instructor. This can often lead to one or more members of your team dragging their feet while the rest cover their load. This was easily the worst part of my UoP experience, since students on the same degree track often found themselves on the same team class after class.

The good part is that the classes move very quickly and the books are almost all online. Even considering the extremely high tuition, I would recommend this school if you can take the pressure and have the diligence to set your own schedule. If I were to change anything, it would be to lower the tuition to something more reasonable and to eliminate the teams.

4 out of 5
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Overall this was the first school I decided to go back to finish my BA after taking a leave of absence from school and I would not recomend it to anyone. It is highly expensive and you can get "more bang for your buck" at other schools. It seemed like they were always raising tuition to match whatever my Financial Aid reward was, so there was never any money to get books. Also, the degree did not increase my earning potential and I ended up with about $78,000 in debt. I am now attending Capella for my Master's Degree and find alot of the things taught at UoP aren't really seen in a favorable light by many teachers and students, it is actually a thorn in alot of people's sides. If I had a say I would recomend another school....just do your research.

4 out of 5
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I would reccomend the university of Phoenix to any student that can not physically go to class or that is worried about travel cost or just enjoyes learning from home! I am a single mother of two kids and it would have been impossible for me to make it to four classes everyday! University of Phoenix allowed me the freedom to learn when it was convinent for me and it took the stress out of getting my degree! There are tons of choices of degrees available and the overall experience was much better than my experience with brick and morter universities! The Psych program through University of Phoenix made my degree possible for me!

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