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University of Phoenix Reviews

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Student & Graduate Reviews (1,037)

5 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration and Management, General
Graduation Year: 2015

Hi this information is for the adult wanting to go back to school but thinks it costs too much, This is what is on my mind but with the question of profit schools and business owners may not want you at their establishment. Take this thought out of your head it doesn't matter one way or the other some non profit want money up front and if you are in school with an unpaid balance you cannot log on. The UoPx's financial aid department works with you the adviser is there too. The team papers I have to admit can become frustrating especially in the associates program but after a while it is worth seeing other viewpoints and when members don't do their part they lose points. I was frustrated with some of the instructors but that comes with the territory not everyone is alike. The classes are tough but you can do it if you cut -out the social life, or pick and chose the activities, don't over do it and get a resentment your grades will suffer. Time management is all you need and remember you don't always have to get and 'A' you are unique get your degree in little pieces don't look at the whole course work and determine whether you can do it or not, take it one day at a time. I didn't think it would be possible to earn a degree when your over forty-years while working full-time and raising grandchildren but if I would have thought about it in that way I would have never known how it feels to be proud to say I have a degree and yes it feels awesome. When it comes to how I'm going to pay for it, or which school ask yourself how much am I worth? Go for it you will be as elated as I'am

4 out of 5
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Degree: Elementary Education
Graduation Year: 2013

I am a Phoenix. I earned my AA in Elementary Education and my BA in English. Here are a few things you may want to know. First, I did not work full time during these 4.5 years. Second, your AA is the harder of the 2 degrees because you are not taking a lot of classes that you are interested in. This is also true at your local community college. Third, it is very expensive but you can choose to have a 6 month deferment and your lender will work with you. Remember, college is expensive no matter where you go. Fourth, the team environment is for your own good. I hated it so much at first. You have your individual assignments but you also have a team each class. By the last six months I realized the value of team. You will have to work with many different people at your job with many different opinions and other characteristics. Just remember that the instructor can see everything that is posted and has the ability to give separate grades to each person if they feel it is warranted. Fifth, the financial aid department is a mess and you need to keep up with all of your loans and ask about everything. I found out half way through my BA that my English degree required 6 months more of classes and that I had reached my maximum loan amount (there is a maximum for every degree) and had no money to cover it. I of course pitched a fit. They accommodated me by paying for all but $300 of it because they failed to tell me. Other than the financial aid it went well. Sixth, it is accredited and my State and local School Board have had no problem recognizing my degree. I am a teacher (high school) because of University of Phoenix and my hard work. I would do it all over again. It will be the hardest thing you ever do but well worth it. Good Luck to you all and by the way, my daughter just graduated with the same 2 degrees that I did and is going for her masters. Do your homework about the college you select. It took me 3 months to choose one.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2015

DO not waste your time with the school. They tell you it is easy for the working class, and the first three mandatory classes are easy, but once you get into the real classes, the technology takes a dive. For instance, I was able to read the text on my phone and tablet. This was great for work and times I was commuting or had free time, I could do some reading. After I started the core classes, this option was usually not available, and you could only read on a laptop or computer that allowed you to unlock the PDF textbook each time you opened it. They had it so protected, you couldn’t download and then transfer it to another device. Another issue is the group work. People taking online courses don’t have time to meet with five other people, who are all over the country, and work together for 5 weeks to make a final project. If it was one week, it wouldn’t be so bad. You usually have someone that doesn’t do their part and you have to scramble at the last minute to make it up so you can get a decent grade. I have had better luck and greater technology at the local community college so STAY AWAY!!!

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4 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2016

I have taken classes at UoP on and off over the years (due to personal circumstances) and at first when I started in the Associates Program they called it Axia College. Apparently that is all apart of University of Phoenix now. I must say there are great improvements over the years at University of Phoenix with regards to the quality of materials provided and so far the quality of instructors (knock on wood). I hear this "for profit school's are bad" garbage all the time. Tell me what school is not for profit? Go to the local community college or state university. Ask for a free college course. Let me know how that works out! Private schools don't get state funding (which helps reduce tuition). Private schools rely on Title IV (federal funding), cash, and tuition reimbursement. Nothing is free folks. And no... I don't work for Apollo Group or University of Phoenix nor do I have any stock invested in Apollo Group or University of Phoenix. No degree, no certification, no brand of school is going to guarantee a job. Each of those items I just listed are tools to better YOU. It's YOU who makes it or breaks it.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology, General
Graduation Year: 2015

UOP is basically one of those schools that tell you one thing but you will eventually end up doing another. I am currently earning my degree in psychology (Associates) and I wished I did more research on the school. Their tuition is beyond high and some of the classes are ridiculous because of the teachers hard grading. When it comes to academic and financial advisors, they basically talk you out of more money instead of doing things that fit you and your degree you are trying to earn. Also, you do not get much money from them. If you do not pass a class, you do not receive your pell grant and they keep it. It is honestly a waste of time and most importantly money

4 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2014

The classes and instructors were very similar to the experiences my friends who went to traditional colleges experienced. The majority of instructors were very helpful, but some were only in it for the paycheck. As long as you focus on your assignments the work load is not very difficult, but it is not an automatic degree just for signing up.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2003

University of Phoenix would rather sign up students for a lifetime of student loan debt than provide a quality education. The method does not counsel the individual, but acts as a mill. The content was survey level at best and did not prepare me for a workplace job in the field.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods, Other
Graduation Year: 2012

Three are a few things you need to know before deciding to attend University of Phoenix. 1. I worked my tail off to EARN my education at University of Phoenix, and you will too. There were no freebees from any professor. This is not a school for those who slack, or think it’s an easy “A.” 2. Every class at University of Phoenix has group-oriented projects. 2.1. Groups can be a good experience, or they can be a nightmare. It’s up to you and the other team members to manage your group. If you just sit and complain about your group, you are not doing your job as a teammate. Your responsibility is to do your job, and also ensure your teammates are doing his or her job. Yes, this involves conflict, and resolving conflict diplomatically. I admit, in my early program years I was not always diplomatic. Then again, not every student has my drive to want to learn, to make something of the education I earned. Every now and then you will experience slacker. Trust me, slackers do not last long in the school. They are the ones who complain about the workload, and the university. 2.2. I learned quite a bit about myself during group projects, my organizational, and my leadership ability. Taking a leadership role in a group project is more work, but the learning experience is great. Hence, the purpose of groups is learning about yourself, others, and diplomacy. 3. I had one professor who was a total jack-wagon. In my opinion, I experienced jack-wagon professors at the other universities I attended, so I guess I am par for the course. You are going to have at least one professor that you do not agree with, either it’s a personality conflict, or just a difference in opinion. Your job as a student is to learn. 4. Do not blame your shortcomings on the university. If you are one who does, I deduce you will have the same experience at other universities. 5. Your education is just like anything in life. If you put nothing in, you get nothing out. Last, I was inducted into Delta Mu Delta, International Honor Society in Business for my Bachelor of Science in Management, and Master in Business Administration (MBA). I EARNED both degrees from University of Phoenix.

3 out of 5
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Degree: MBA in Human Resources
Graduation Year: 2010

I received two degrees from UOP. I sorry to say but my life went downhill after I completed my DBA. There are very few organizations that acknowledge the school. My pastor mentioned that the school lost it's accreditation. I'm unemployed at the moment and only mention my BS degree used by Cleveland State University. My many years working at the city of Cleveland didn't pay off because six months after I 'paid' for my DBA I got laid off. Took a position at minimum wage for one year. Seven months later promoted to VIP Host and was very unhappy because management there didn't want to promote me and hired a person that they ended up terminating. They made a bad choice. I've interviewed for a management position at a company that is willing to take my word for it. They are concerned about my DBA and asked if I plan to stay with their organization. Loyalty is what I possess. I plan to retire from the organization if hired.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration, Management and Operations, Other
Graduation Year: 2014

A very solid and good school. I received a degree in Business Management and I was able to be employed within 6 months. The degree really helped push me forward in finding a new career. Many employers recognized my degree. The teachers were very good and I had a quality education. The facilities were new and updated as well. Would recommend to anyone looking for a solid education with good instruction.

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