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University of Phoenix Reviews

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Student & Graduate Reviews (1,037)

4 out of 5
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Degree: Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, General
Graduation Year: 2016

I have to start off by saying that any review you read make sure you are reading in detail their problem. Could the problem have been avoided by the student? What could the student/teacher done to correct it? Could the student have done more on their part? These questions need to be answered in order to for the review to be effective when there are negative reviews. I have had a near perfect experience with this university. I have not had any problems with my classes being scheduled or with professors. Some professors were harder than others but that is at any college. I ran into one issue with financial aid after the university scheduled my class to start 2 weeks after my last class ended. Financial aid called me and said my classes would be dropped because I had not been active for 2 weeks. I informed them t was because my classes were scheduled two weeks apart. I was informed in the future to sign a leave of absence for those two weeks so I would not be in fear of having my financial aid dropped. I also think financial aid needs to create a medium between them and academics so students will not get their classes dropped on behalf of the university's doing. Other than that everything has been wonderful. I have honestly learned a lot and have become more focused and disciplined through these rigorous online classes.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology
Graduation Year: 2016

Don't go to the University of Phoenix. If you are a good student you will have to do group assignments with truly mental students. The staff will not care if you are unhappy with a professor or are being bullied by other students. They will care when you need to pay them money. If you are stupid and want to buy a diploma, go to the University of Phoenix. I have quit the University of Phoenix and I am about to start at another university.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration, Management and Operations, Other
Graduation Year: 2017

I'm currently carrying a 3.79 GPA, studying for my BS in Business Management with a certificate in Advanced Software Development. My experience falls along the lines of I get out of this school what I put into it, and I'm already getting paid even though I graduate in 2017 (more on that in a moment). I went to a prestigious university right after high school, but I didn't take it seriously. I ended up losing my financial aid at the time because my GPA dipped below 2.0. I also got into some legal trouble, but despite my personal struggles, I managed to build a solid career in IT, and ran my own business until I lost it all in the recession. Long story short, I'm getting back to where I was, and I started another business. Over 20 years later, I decided to go back to get my degree, but I didn't have time to go to a traditional school. I decided on UoPX because one of my closest friends got his degree there several years earlier. He's currently doing very well as a senior analyst for a large health services organization, he's paid off his student loans, and his degree has opened many doors for him. Personally, I decided to get my degree as an example to my two young sons. I couldn't very well stress the value of a college education to them if I didn't have one, especially when I had done very well without it. The online classes fit easily into my work and home schedule, and I've learned a lot from the materials. I had good instructors and bad instructors at my last 4 -year university, and I've had good and bad instructors at Phoenix. Just like at the 4-year university, I could tell which ones actually cared, which ones didn't, and which ones are competent. I took classes that were a joke at the 4-year university, and I took classes that took every ounce of effort just to get a C. At Phoenix, I characterize the classes here as somewhere between easy and tedious. The classes that have challenged me simply had a lot of assignments due, and I simply did not have enough time in my schedule to get all of the work done. The group assignments pose a challenge to coordinate everyone's schedule to complete the work online. All of my groups, though, have had serious students, so I've never had a problem with flakes. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that I transferred in with a lot of units, so I've taken mostly core and upper division classes. Perhaps the less serious students have already been weeded out by this time? Phoenix does let new students take classes on a trial basis. Again, this was my experience 20 years ago going to one of the best colleges in my state; some students simply did not care and let others shoulder the load in group assignments. The academic and financial advisors have been very diligent in checking in with me. I hear from someone at least monthly, and every time I call, I get assistance. In fact, I was studying for my Project Management Certificate, and I changed my mind and wanted to take software programming. My advisor got approval for me to get an ASD Certificate outside of the School of Business. The reason I did this is because I stumbled upon a situation after I finished my last Accounting class. A business owner hired me to straighten his books out. After that project, I've been advertising myself for part-time bookkeeping services, which does not require any degree, credential, or certification. I have an appointment tomorrow afternoon with a second potential client. I used what I learned, so now I'm making a little extra money on the side. With each programming class I complete, I have the chance to compete for more software programming contracts for my consulting business. I know so many people with 4 year degrees who don't even use them. My ex-wife has a degree from a traditional 4-year university. Because she stayed at home during our marriage and doesn't have recent job experience, she can't find a job that pays more than $12/hour (hard to live on in California). I know so many more people without college degrees who make six figures and up. Many years ago, the MCSE in IT was considered a joke certification, but now many IT jobs require it. I've sat on interview panels, and seen people get passed over with degrees and certifications but no experience. A degree does not guarantee a job, especially without the relevant experience, but it can open doors for someone who's paying attention. I recommend to anyone considering Phoenix, that before attending Phoenix, get all the lower division classes done at a community college first, if there is one in the area. First, it's cheaper; why pay $410 a unit for basic Math and English classes? Community colleges in California charge $50 a unit (I believe, but don't quote me), and students can still get financial aid there. Second, life happens. Kids get sick, jobs get crazy, cars break down, relatives die. If life gets in the way and you need to take a leave, better to do so with only a few hundred or maybe a thousand dollar student loan debt than $15,000. I agree with others here who have said it's not for everyone. 5 week classes and the online format takes a little getting used to. I learn by doing and watching, so the interactive tutorials and videos help me the best. I don't learn by listening, so I don't get much sitting in a classroom listening to a lecture. Also, if I have issues, I talk to my instructor. If my instructor doesn't help, I call my academic advisor. If I still don't get help, I go up the chain until someone does. Hey, I'm paying $15 grand a year, and it's my education. Now that the Feds have cracked down on for-profit colleges, I expect many more people to have the same experience I'm having. In fact, it may even be worth it to put less weight on any comments (positive or negative) from people who attended Phoenix prior to 2015. Lastly, I haven't had any negative feedback so far about attending Phoenix. Colleagues and clients have reacted positively, and no one has said anything about it being a worthless degree or diploma mill. In fact, I've already gotten paying work and I haven't even graduated. I will say that having sat on interview panels, I've seen more than my fair share of terrible resumes. I've seen resumes from Stanford graduates that seemed like a third grader wrote it. Needless to say, they didn't get hired. It may not be the Phoenix degree holding someone back. Just saying.

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5 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology, General
Graduation Year: 2016

I just graduated with my Bachelors in psychology . I made honors . thing is any college you go to and get a degree doesn't guarantee you a job . This school has been the best 4 years of my life. I didn't even think I could get a degree and I ended up with two. Now signed up with other college for my master's and PhD.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Education
Graduation Year: 2009

The education was lackluster and this is a predatory school. I am a veteran and they have messed up the VA so much that somehow I have come out owning when ti should have been paid for. They have sent so many papers over to the VA that it has become a mess of accounts received and paid. The VA over paid the school and now I am accountable for the funds because mms school should have sent them to me? DO NOT TRUST THE UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX!!

5 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration
Graduation Year: 2017

Although many schools have online degrees now, UoP has been doing so for a long time and I value that. I have many friends and colleagues that completed all different levels of degrees from UoP and they all recommended it, as would I. I work 2 mid-high level Finance positions and have a young child, so attending a brick and mortar school is not an option for me. Online education results are all directly correlated to the student. You will get our what you put in. I feel the UoP presents and delivers a wonderful advanced education and especially for those that have to work school into their already busy routines.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Criminal Justice
Graduation Year: 2018

My academic advisor and financial aid advisor are both great. I always have someone to talk to and they are always asking if there is anything that they can do, no matter what the problem is. They are positive and influential. They are always at the best interest in me and only me. They make sure I don't "overspend" with my financial aid so that I would not have to pay more than expected back and are always checking in on me to see how I like my classes. I have nothing bad to say about this school. I love this school and the people with it. The university is definitely living up to its standards.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration
Graduation Year: 2016

The experience of any school online or traditional will always be on you. I worked full time, father of twins, and managed to get through a 4-year degree. My employer reimbursed me for almost the entire program. I spent a lot of time reading, writing, working in groups, and taking CLEP exams to finish the program. I also took advantage of the 'prior learning experience' opportunity. Overall it was a well rounded academic experience and resume now has a degree 'completed' displayed which it did not have before. My advice to anyone interested is to try and avoid reading reviews and do what works best for you. As with anything in life everyone will have their own experience. Just focus and a accomplish your goals for you and your family.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Healthcare Administration
Graduation Year: 2011

I would not have attended this school knowing what I know now. I received my degree in 2011 and have yet to utilize it. I now have to go back to school so I can earn better pay so I can pay my student loans off. Attend a community college, You are better off!

2 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration
Graduation Year: 2016

From the day I began it was very clear that I was nothing more than a dollar sign. I was hassled by my financial aid "adviser", my student counselor was not interested in my education, and the login requirements per week were the highest of any online school I've ever attended. At one point I emailed my financial aid adviser a question and it took her 11 DAYS to reply back. It was not during vacation time, it was in the middle of a semester, and if she was too busy she should have had someone else monitoring or helping with her emails. 11 Days for a response about the status of my financial aid is absolutely ridiculous. When starting out I was emailing my counselor about my previous colleges and the credits I needed to transfer. After a couple of weeks into the semester I emailed her asking if my credits had transferred because it appeared they hadn't yet, and it had been 3 weeks. Did they need me to assist in something or were we waiting on my past colleges? When I emailed her, I didn't get a response until a week later and she CC'd my financial adviser, enrollment adviser, and head of the transcripts department to say that there was no record of my attendance at any of these schools. I had to contact each and every school and get them sent to her because she was contacting the wrong locations of my schools and got incorrect information. The employees who work here act like they themselves do not have a degree, don't expect fast or frequent communication, and expect to be treated like a dollar sign and nothing more. I decided to transfer to a non profit instead and it was then that they could email me and call me when they realized their money was walking away.

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