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University of Phoenix Reviews

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Student & Graduate Reviews (1,037)

4 out of 5
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I graduated UOP in 2006 with MBA/Global Management. As soon as I graduated I was making close to 6 figures and a year later made 6 figs. Although that was a contract position, I have always made above 70k since 2006. Before 2006, i was stuck in the 50k range. Say what you will, do what you want but the numbers do not lie. You can dispute all you want but the numbers do not lie. My only regret, I did not get my MBA sooner. That is the bottom line.

4 out of 5
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First let me start by saying that while UOP may not be anyone's top choice for colleges, it is certainly a school that holds its own.For working adults with families like me, this was the best option. The coursework is challenging for those that strive to maintain a 4.0. Yes, the tuition is high but I have friends who attended institutions 20 years ago and are still paying back their loans, and some of them are currently out of work. I have attended on ground classes, which I prefer, and I have had some great instructors and some not so great instructors. The great ones have far outweighed the bad ones. Some of the instructors I have had are well established individuals who have been extremely successful in their careers. In my experience I have come across many who put down one school over another. An education is what you make of it and what you put into it. This school has been the subject of a lot of bad press but I am still proud to be receiving my degree this year and no one is going to take that away from me. I have certainly worked hard as well as my fellow classmates to earn this and I look forward to hanging my degree up in my home.

4 out of 5
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The classes themselves were okay and the instructors are good. But like students this is a second properity for them. The finanical aid deptment is awful! I drop after I finished my last class, I sent a offical drop too FA and they were still sending me notices two months later to fill out my loan information for next class. dud? I e-mail them at least ten times called was told lines were too busy and the school itself refused to fill out forms needed for my current school.

Futhermore trying to get my transcript is not going to easy either. I have my hands full for the last three months tring to transfer my info over to my new college. I still have not had no respond on the credit in my account there. So I doubt I will get that back..

Beware of this place the classes and fees are total 1070.00 each there are two class for every nine weeks of schools.... I would not recommend to go there...

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4 out of 5
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I decided to attend University of Phoenix because I work full time, have a heavy commute (3 hours a day), and a toddler at home. I knew there was no ability for me to attend school whether day or night classes as my down time doesn't start until about 10pm.

I am five classes short of receiving an associates degree. Initally I had signed on the Elementary Education program. Unfortunately, I didn't ask too many questions as I was just in a rush to get started. I received a call a few weeks ago from a "transition" counselor who is there to help aid me from the associates degree to the bachelors.

In discussing the program she informed me there is a 12 week long internship required before graduation. I guess most everyone knows it is required to "student teach" before you can graduate, however I had no idea the internship was this long. As I mentioned before I am a full time working mother, and cannot quit my job for three months to go back to school, otherwise I would be in a traditional college. I hit a wall and didn't know where to go from there.

The counselor quickly tried to talk me into another degree, and I had almost signed on, until I realize that the price per class runs about 1700!! So, from the point of earning my associates and graduating I would have accumulated 34k in debt, not to mention what I already owe thus far (about 13k).

I had raved about this school prior to really looking into the costs- so much so that I got my husband enrolled for IT. Thank god he's only two classes in. We're working on pulling him out as quickly as possible. Who can afford 50k in student loans? The payment on that is about 600 a month, unless you extend it paying interest only for years and then you could actually accure an additional 50k in interest, totaling 100k in loans! You could be a doctor!

I'm left now with 13k I owe and no degree, and not sure what college would even accept my credits from this school. It's all quite disappointing as all I had wanted to do was be a good role model for my daughter. I'm putting school on hold for a while until I can get this all sorted out. I can't make the same mistakes again.

4 out of 5
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I'm currently enrolled at UofP and there's not much else I can add that hasn't already been commented on but I'll add my take on it anyway.

I'll start with my biggest gripe. My biggest complaint has to do with how UoP accepts their students. Unfortunately, it has very little to do with their aptitude and nearly everything to do with their credit score. This fundamental difference compared to the brick and mortar schools contributes to the negative image towards UoP. I guess the idea is that, if they're willing to accept anybody then they're willing to give anyone their degree provided they've sat through the courses and 'gotten by'. I'm not going to candy coat it and say that all my classmates have put in the effort and deserve the passing grades they've gotten so far, because there are a few that are just skating. But a lot of my classmates are able to accomplish the tasks of the curriculum and rightfully deserve to pass.

Another gripe that has already been stated is the group work. Yes, if you enroll at UofP and are one of the folks that really strives for a perfect grade then you will undoubtedly have to pick up the slack of one or more of your teammates. You can easily avoid this by actually observing the folks in your program and do yourself the service of determining which ones are worthy of being in your group. All of my instructors thus far have let us pick our own groups. Since starting the program, I've remained with 2 members from the start while having to kick a couple for not pulling their weight. The final presentation is a large portion of your overall grade and in turn is largely determined by the efforts of the entire team. It's simple, pick the most capable members of your class to be on your team. If they don't perform.....Boot 'em. Unfortunately the group method affords the slackers a perfect platform for getting by without really doing much of anything.

The aspect that grinds me the most is that the otherwise would-be failures are going to get their degree, go out into the work world and highlight their new UoP degree, and the potential employer is left shaking their head in astonishment that this person actually got a degree. This resonates to the professional community that UoP is nothing more than an institution that operates like a big box retail store. Pay me X number of dollars and we'll make sure that you get your product i.e. a little piece of paper that says "I are Smart."

Another gripe is the cost. Yes, it's terribly expensive. Although, considering my full time job and obligations to my family, I cannot afford to spend hours in a classroom multiple days a week. The time I spend in an actual classroom is ideal considering how much time I'm available to my other obligations. Needless to say that if you don't have the ability to accomplish tasks on your own then you're going to fail at UofP. Hand holding is not an option here.

Here are a few things that I do appreciate from UoP. All of my instructors thus far have at least a masters if not a Ph.D. and are currently employed in the field that corresponds to the course they are teaching. Compare that to the brick and mortar professors who got their scholastic accolades 2-3 decades ago and have almost no practical knowledge in the arena that they're teaching now.

All of my instructors have been available to answer any questions or concerns that I've had. I nearly always get a response right away. The avenues of communication are opened via the school forums, their personal email addresses and even their personal telephone numbers.

Lastly, the curriculum is pretty in depth and you're not left wanting more content to go explore, it's all there for you to dive into. I've been to other major universities and taking nothing away from them, and UoP offers a similar curriculum. So the only real difference is the format, where traditional schools test you and UoP makes you present the material.

Online schooling isn't going away, it's growing, and I implore you to do a bit of research and you'll find that most major universities are now offering distance learning and online degree programs. Technology is changing and schools are being forced to adapt.

Sorry for the wall of text....I'll give you the condensed version.

Pros - The curriculum is solid and the majority of the instructors are knowledgeable and available.

Cons - There are going to be sub-par graduates from this school who will diminish the perception of the degree earned from this school.

As for the folks that are having issues with their counselors, financial aid....whatever. That's situational. If you don't know what courses you need to take or can't handle your personal finances, then no amount of schooling can assist you. You're in more need of common sense than anything.

4 out of 5
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I entered University of Phoenix believing that their Master’s program/curriculum is something of value and essence. I wanted to further my education, be able to sit in the CPA exam and an online class is my best alternative considering I am a busy mother with a job and a family to juggle.

I must admit I did not do an extensive research or ask too many questions about this school. I wanted to get into the program immediately and finish. To make the story short, I got too easily, not too may questions, not too much probing on my transcript of records.

I started the program and thought I would be impressed. I did not. There is this one lady whose grammar is so off that I wondered how in the world did she get in? It is a master’s curriculum for heaven’s sake. To say the least, the master’s program came to me like I was in an undergraduate school paying a graduate price.

I am not here to degrade the school. I am trying to say to all of you out there considering this school is “Please make an informed decision. Don’t rush yourself thinking that they have a great masters program.” Take your time. See all other options out there. More importantly do not waste your money and your time.

The worst part of the experience is that my master courses are not transferable to the Brick and Mortar University I am in (thank heavens they offered online classes). In short, all my money and my time wasted and I am very disappointed and there is no word as to how disappointed I am with the waste.

I decided to write this because this is my only way to help all of you out there to make an informed decision.

Good luck!

4 out of 5
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I started on my MBA at the UoP online about 9 years ago. I took 2 1/2 courses and then had to drop out for personal reasons.

My brief education with UoP was enlightening. I felt more challenged and put more effort towards completing my assignments than I did in the traditional college campus environment.

I was able to continue working my full-time job, have a personal life, and further my education at the same time. My company also believed in UoP and offered tuition reimbursement for attending.

Nine years later, I am ready to continue pursuing my MBA. UoP is my first choice because it has what I need as far as courses and flexibility. In the UoP online environment I also get to meet and work with other professionals from around the world who are employed with well-known companies. (To me that is a great networking and learning opportunity.) I don't think I will get much of a diversity in the traditional classroom environment in my local area.

4 out of 5
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My apologies for the long posting.

I have recently graduated from UoP with a BSB/Administration after 2 years of Business core classes only; I had previously taken my lower courses at a brick and mortar school in my early twenties. I think that UOP is an excellent option for working/married adults who cannot attend a traditional school to get their undergraduate education (UOP has stolen a lot of students from state schools in El Paso just because of its flexible schedule). Let's face it, we no longer have the patience to sit in a campus classroom with 40 young students who can easily beat us at math; but, on the other hand, they would not understand our working experience during class discussion.

REASONS TO ATTEND (UNDERGRADUATE): 1) Excellent text books and online learning tools (state of the art) 2) Excellent classrooms 3) A lot of presentations and talking on public 4) A lot of papers (APA format) 5) Flexible schedule (4hrs class - 10hrs recommended to read the chapters - 2/4hrs meeting with your team outside of class - all these per week)

POSSIBLE ARGUMENTS FOR NOT ATTENDING (UNDERGRADUATE): 1) If you are young and free to attend a traditional school 2) If you are more comfortable with straight academic-learning instead of bringing your work experience to classroom discussions 3) Cost: very expensive, however check with your employers if they have tuition reimbursement (mine did) or financial aid 4) The eternal thing about learning teams, common! we all know that teamwork on the corporate world means good people making up for bad people, that is everywhere you go. However, you have the responsibility to post a team log every week and you can log the parts you were responsible for; (if you are striving to become a leader you will know that the people working for you will not always think and do things like you) 5) The instructors: if you read your weekly chapters, follow the syllabus, take advantage of electronic tutorials and labs, you will just relax, ask questions when not clear, and listen to their work related stories. 6) If you think that there is a significant difference between ACBSP (UOP) and AACSB (University of Texas) certification at UNDERGRADUATE level.

GRADUATE SCHOOL: Traditional schools have an upper hand with their MBA programs. 1) UOP no longer has an advantage by claiming flexibility and teamwork. Traditional schools run Accelerated (COHORT teams) and Flexible programs that fit working adults - as a matter of fact, you are expected to be working - 2) Price: UOP runs at 10K more than UTEP, same time (2 yrs) 3) If you worry about your future team, traditional schools require the GMAT test for admission combined with subjective requirements, so they claim their students will be carefully selected 4) the nightmare of AACSB vs ACBSP: we are sure that good students are found anywhere and I don't mean to fall on the trap, but there is extreme prejudice by employers against MBA's that come from non-AACSB schools (like UOP). On this one you really need to do some research and make some decissions before jumping into a program, be sure you know where you want to go and don't just rely on rumors from both sides.

ONE TIP BEFORE LEAVING: University of South Dakota offers a 39-credit MBA (AACSB) online for only $10,000, I think the page is www.usd.edu

4 out of 5
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I'll start with the positives. The UOP online forum is very advanced and easy to use. They provide the tools you need, including the class text book. The administrative team is helpful and responsive.

However, when I rate a school...any school, I'm obviously looking at it from the school's ability to fulfill my personal objectives.

I'm a 41 year old mother of 2. I have 18 years of progressive sr. experiece in another field...but I chose a master's in psychology. I'm taking a different direction with my life. Nonetheless, I expected my fellow students to engage me in enlightening conversation and be one of the greatest contributors to my learning experience.

I, quite frankly, don't know how 80% of these folks ever got their Bachelor's degree. Is proper writing no longer a criteria for professionalism? Is the easy way out the road to a quality education?

During my 4 classes I only had one professor who was willing to be critical enough to make sure I took a learning experience away from the class. UOP touts their project team experience as valuable, but by the time you finish your Bachelor's degree, you should have a solid understanding of these skills. The quality of people on 3 of my 4 teams did nothing but make me have to work harder to retain my own quality of work (ie. I had to make up their shortcomings).

I've since transferred to another school. I'm much happier, but there's another side to this picture. My work stands on its own, but, at my new school, a much greater responsibility is on the student to read the material and take as much as possible away from the course.

If you're a bachelor's degree student UOP might be great, but I found their master's program to be an invitation to mediocrity. If you're proactive and dedicated to your education-NOT JUST A DEGREE-then I suggest you give other schools a try.

4 out of 5
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I attended this school for about a year. The entire time I was there it was a mess trying to get ahold of people. I would constantly call and email and would rarely get a response.

I didn't feel like I was getting a good education. Yes, I had great grades. I rarely had to study or do anything to keep those. I like to feel challenged when getting degrees, especially for that kind of money.

I transferred to another university here in my state and they could not receive my financial aid because UoP had not done their paperwork 4 months ago like they were supposed to. They finally released everything.

It's very chaotic. Teachers never respond and counselors are worse. I would not want anyone I know attending this school. Good luck to those of you who do.

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