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Baker College Online Reviews - Bachelor's in

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39 Reviews
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4 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2015

I need to write this review since it seems many other reviews paint Baker College in a negative frame and I am sorry some feel that way. In 2015 received a BS in Information Technology and Security and was on the Presidents list multiple times. Today I reviewed the curriculum for the degree and it has changed as I would hope it would have since Security changes everyday. My degree prepared me far better than a fellow employee who had a Masters from another college within the same IT/Security. My instructors were from the field and were not uninformed of the "real world" as they had real life experiences and shared them. Where some students were "newbies" and others well seasoned the prof's could relate to all of them. Many instructors made the point your degree will not be the reason you get a job, be sure to get credentials such as a CompTIA type, Cisco cert or MS cert. I read a few reviews how Baker does not prepare you for these, my classes did prepare me mostly due to the real life experiences from the profs in IT and the textbooks were current. Especially for the A+ exam. The General Ed classes ( fill in classes like humanity, to make you a well rounded student), they had much to be desired. One item is be firm with the college. I was told I needed to take Math 099 to place me since I had not taken Algebra in my former degree. When I spoke with the college and explained I had taken all 300-400 level classes (since at my former University they placed me in those classes) and to look at my transcripts they said something like, oh how did we miss that. So be firm with them, the college is there to make money. My Algebra II prof was not a positive instructor, she spoke of her life experiences which went more toward a Social class over a Mathematics class. She was intelligent in mathematics but I felt as though I was back in a High School class since if I did not show my work the way she wanted to see it I was marked down. In the real world you solve the problem at hand and cannot follow one way. I received a C in this class since basically I checked out due to her attitude whereas in the Algebra I class I aced it since it was fun and easy to relate to that prof. To sum up my experience, the General Ed courses were drudgery and there to make the college more money, I made it thru them and the strong opinions of many instructors. The IT/Security portion of the degree was awesome, one class I may have changed a bit, however the instructors I had in all the rest were above what I expected. Upon graduating I was working with a Fortune 50 company and gaining more insight. Baker is not a waste of money, price for tuition is reasonable and the Online offering was what I needed. I now plan on gaining my MBA/IS from Baker Online to become the next CIO at our organization.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Human Resources Management and Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2012

I went to Baker (Online) for my BBA in HR Management. I was a bit tepidness as many of us in Michigan know, Baker has a bit of an unpopular favor. However, they are accredited and I read enough reviews to give it a try. The program I was in required a lot of hard research but ended up being so worth it. I have been in HR since 2012 and I am very successful. Better yet, when I went to take my PHR test (for those not in HR this is a very important title to your name in HR) I passed it on my first attempt. Less than 55% of PHR test takers pass on their first try. So clearly the knowledge I needed to pass a hard internationally known exam, was obtained through Baker. A lot of the bad image, in my opinion, is from Universities and the push to scare people to pay much more $$ to have a University on their resume. It is time to stop that. We have a skills deficit because so many are focusing on what college instead of what skill is in demand. Consider Baker, consider a tech school or a tech program, consider them all and do your research where you will get more of a return in your investment.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology, General
Graduation Year: 2017

I am 2 courses away from graduation and earning my BS in Psychology. I have had a great overall experience. This program has prepared me to go onto a graduate program at another college; I've already been accepted. The other school had no issues evaluating my transcript and allowing me to by pass a couple course because my undergraduate course work already included those courses. I only had 1 rude professor and she in English very early on. The quarter system helped me to obtain my degree faster but they are switching to the traditional semester system next Fall. I will definitely miss Baker.

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4 out of 5
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Degree: Business Administration, Management and Operations, Other
Graduation Year: 2017

Online school is not for everyone just as any degree is not for everyone. Online school is harder and requires more time than on ground classes. Also, you can wish to pursue a career but it does not mean you are going to succeed in it. For example, some people are not born to be doctors even if they want to be doctors. I wanted to be dental assistant and obtained the diploma for it but once it came to work as a dental assistant I knew it wasn’t for me! I love numbers but accounting career is not for me unless it’s income taxes. However, the finance is! Here I am pursuing a Bachelor’s in Business Administration Finance concentration and right after I will proceed with grad school. I had my ups and downs with the instructors but I made sure to let them know since at the end of the day I am paying them to teach me, also I have to pitch in even if they not doing their job and let admissions know about it. As I read the comments from others everyone is giving the bad review for the instructors and I ask myself if the students took time to do the review questionnaires at the end of each class about their instructors? Believe it or not Baker takes them seriously and takes action. I knew when I had an issue with a professor and reported it to my adviser it went straight to Dean and they took care of it. So we can’t blame Baker for our failures can we?!I am happy with Baker as a college and I agree that there are professors that do not participate in the class, the student has to learn on their own and participate with students to make their participation points and that is the reason it’s called online school. The professor is not there when you need them, they are there when they are available from their regular day job. Therefore, you might wait 24 hours before they respond to you. My advice to struggling students is to contact tutors to get help rather than waiting on the instructor because I did it in past where I did not bother reaching out to the instructor. I got hold of the tutor at Baker and its completely free and they take time to explain everything clearly for the student to understand and be prepared. At last, if the help doesn’t come to you seek for it. It’s your life, it’s your knowledge, and it’s your career! Good luck to the future students! Remember if you are not good figuring things on your own, online school is not for you! :)

4 out of 5
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2015

I am finally graduating after 5 years at Baker. I have a previous bachelor's so my experience here is compared to that and may not be the same for everyone. Transfer credits - I saw some complaints about this. Not sure if things have changed since 2010 but Baker fully honored 100% of my relevant classes from my previous degree. It may depend on what institution you are coming from (I had graduated from a different Michigan school) but it worked out well for me. The material - It was really hit or miss, depending on the class. Some classes, specifically the core computer science ones, were very good and had challenging material. I have several good friends who are CS majors and they all said what I was learning was on par with what they'd expect for a BCS. This was a concern for me when I originally decided to attend because I didn't want to get a joke degree. That being said, some classes simply did challenge me enough. The database classes in particular I wish were 1-2 weeks longer. I felt we were just getting a good hold on the content and then the class was over. The electives, particularly for my interests (programming, algorithms, databases/structures) were very sparse but I did feel the ones I took were actually worth taking. Every class I took I was glad to have taken it afterward. The instructors - I feel this is where this school really falls short. I had some very good, engaging professors but I also had some that just didn't devote any time to their students. I had one class where it would take 6-7 days for a question to be answered. That is just simply unacceptable for an online environment. As someone else noted in their review, some professors with PhD's would know less than the students. I came across this once or twice, where the professor would be pushing some outdated concept or program, but it was only for one topic. Contrasting from my old degree, I don't think this is that unheard of. Plus, knowing multiple ways to do things is always a plus. Participation - Ugh, the WORST part of this whole experience is trying to find something to say 5 days a week. Some classes it was a breeze but others I really struggled with trying to come up with decent content to discuss. A few classes I just resorted to asking really dumb questions just to get a conversation started. However, participation did offer a great points buffer for those classes where you had zero instructor input which resulted in a lower grade than you may have deserved. Overall - My takeaway from all this is actually fairly positive. I had many times where I was frustrated and the online environment made it difficult to resolve any questions but I got through it. The biggest thing to consider is that you are basically teaching yourself 95% of what you are learning. That means that things won't always be a breeze and you actually have to put in some work. This whole experience has taught me to be much more disciplined and also eager to learn more. I currently have a career in a different field so I am unsure about how this degree from Baker will impact that but it has helped me a lot at work. I am hoping to pursue a master's degree in CS this fall (not at Baker) so that will be the real test of how well this one prepared me. In conclusion, it was a great learning experience and I would recommend the school to working professionals who want a career change in the future.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2010

I think the college is fine if you are in Michigan but if you are in a different area, their degree won't do much for you. Employers tend to look at not only your degree but where you got it. There are also issues with what employers want as far as skill and the classes they offer. Of course I went to grad school after and compounded the issue. I had a 3.95 at Baker and 4.0 in grad school and didn't feel prepared to do much.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Information Technology
Graduation Year: 2009

Some of these rants are valid in some ways. I don't know how you can tell if a course is planned ahead of time and frankly, I don't care. The Computer Science program uses the same book as almost every other computer science program in America. One of the first things I did before attending Baker is find out what books they were using and compare those with what everyone else was using. They are the same for the most part. Most Colleges are not using the new VB programs but instead using 06,08, or VB10, same as Baker. We were told to use Dev-C or Codeblocks but the course recommended Microsoft. I can't speak for most of the core classes, I took most of those in a community college. I know English 102 was right in line with Eng 101 and did teach me things you don't learn much about in high school despite what some people here are saying. I took VB in high school and it was nothing like Baker. All the programming we did at Baker was with on the job skills in mind. We had several group projects and I love that because in the real world you are not writing programs alone!! We spent a lot of time on debugging. I would say SQL was a disappointment, only because I thought I would learn so much more but as I have read that is pretty much at every college. If you want to know about Baker here ya go, It's not a degree mill , people saying that just skip them because they don't even know wth that is. You must work hard, you don't get an A for effort. They will flunk you , kick you out, ect. You will find you are writing a lot of research papers, posting in discussions (some require a stupid amount of class participation so be ready for 500 words per post requirements). You will work with others, some professors do skype seminars but its not required by the course and most post some sort of written lecture. The discussion questions allow you to lecture each other as well. All of its credits transfer to most Universities (a few hate the 10 and 6 weeks systems, but most will accept them). You won't get a degree that says "Baker Online" , your background will show your degree is accredited like any other degree. I don't get the complaints here. You are in distant learning, no matter the college or university you are at, the professor isn't going to spend hours every day lecturing you like you are in class. They will help if you need it and many resources are available but all you need to know is in those books!!! I don't get the complaints. Most of them are lies, if this was a degree mill or easy you wouldn't see the complaining you do and its grad rate would be much higher.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Computer Science
Graduation Year: 2014

It is unfortunate to read some of the negative reviews because my experience at Baker College has been nothing but positive. Of course, there is the exception with some instructors who clearly care only about a paycheck, but most are helpful and enthusiastic about teaching. This is no different than any other institution. Many of the instructors have a Masters, while some have a Ph.D. I have never had an instructor who had any less. Not to mention, every one of them were very skilled in their subject and have held impressive professions prior to or alongside to teaching at Baker.

This institution offers the fundamental tools to become successful, but it is up to the student to put forth the effort. The online programs are accelerated and can be extremely demanding which include several essays, projects, quizzes and participation (for attendance) that involve 2 substantial posts, 5 days out of the week. If you are willing to put forth the effort, you will do well. If you are looking for an easy route, this is not the school for you.

As far as tuition, I have priced out many other institutions and had found Baker to be extremely reasonable. While many institutions (large universities)charge $500/credit hour or more, Baker charges $230/credit hour as of the writing of this review. And no, Baker does not make you buy the books through their bookstore, although they encourage it. A slight downfall is that the administrative staff have yet to be desired, and this is only because they seem very uninformed. I have talked to some of the staff (with the exception of the advisers) who seemed very clueless as to how they should answer my question.

A slight change in subject, I had read someone giving a bad review because an internship was part of her program!! Newsflash: An internship is a great way to get a job, especially if you have no relevant experience! In any event, this is a great example of a reviewer who rated Baker poorly because they did not want to put forth the effort.

WHERE HAS BAKER GOTTEN ME? I am a Computer Science major and am projected to complete the program in 2014. With the help of the tools and skills that Baker has provided, I was able to obtain an internship in the IT department of a major automaker. Not to mention, I have been acknowledged by a major computer manufacturer to whom I am currently interviewing with as we speak for a position as an entry-level applications developer.

During my internship, I have noticed that I had applied my learned skills through each of my core classes and was able to apply them throughout all of my tasks. In other words, I did not go into my internship blindingly, and was already familiar with everything that was brought to the table because of the curriculum at Baker.

Overall, Baker is not for everyone but in my opinion, it is a fantastic school.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Human Resources
Graduation Year: 2012

It is interesting to see all the reviews. I just completed an on line BBA with concentration in HR. This took a lot of hard work and dedication.

If anybody is not commited to doing this or want an easy way out, this is not the way to go. This program was hard and required so much time, but I think Baker is a great school. I never had any issues with instructors and the Blackboard system. It is all what you make of it.

If your mind is set and your willing to work hard, you can achieve your goal with Baker. The online program (especially the accelerated one) is not for people who are not willing to put a lot of time into it!

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