University of Phoenix Reviews - Bachelor's in Business

3.43 out of 5 stars
(155 Reviews)
  • Nationwide
  • Annual Tuition: $9,552
69% of 155 students said this degree improved their career prospects
65% of 155 students said they would recommend this program to others
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Student & Graduate Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Kathleen - 11/3/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2008
"I completed my Bachelor's degree with University of Phoenix. I had been held back from obtaining better jobs due to not having a degree. Once I had my Bachelor's, I was able to move up. I started earning $10K more per year within 6 months, and now 6 years after graduation my income has more than doubled what it was without my degree."
4.5 out of 5 stars
buck - 11/1/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2014
"I will say after my Boise State experience the classes are more difficult and the instructors give a rat's a**. They give you every resource to succeed. There is the best resume building tools I have ever used and a lifetime online library. If people are concerned about unemployment afterwards I know MIT grads that are unemployed. I recommend you go in with an intent of being business owner someday."
4.8 out of 5 stars
Gee - 10/23/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2014
"If you're planning to attend UOP do it, but campus only. Their online program is not for everybody. I personally did not like it and you will get better knowledge in campus..face to face interaction is better!!"
4.0 out of 5 stars
Elle - 10/10/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2012
"I transferred into UOP Online with over 100 credits (not all transferred to my new program) and a 4.0 and ended up completing a business degree there. Although skeptical at first, I found that the online platform was a very good fit for my learning style. The UOP style is different from the traditional academic approach in that it focuses less on academic theory and more on application in the work environment. For example, many assignments encourage students to use examples from their current or previous job, and participation requirements in the 300+-level courses often turn into discussions of what students are experiencing at work and how it compares to the theories they are encountering in class. The facilitator (UOP instructors are not called teachers) does not choose sides, so everyone can argue their case, but the good ones throw in their own professional experience, which is often substantial. I enjoyed having a facilitator with years of work experience to relate to the topics. It is also a self-taught model rather than the old-school approach of sitting in the audience listening to a professor. I enjoy reading and writing, so I was very happy with the experience, that is, after I got over the frustrations with the learning team requirements. However, even though it is a challenge to work with others who procrastinate and turn in sub-par work, I found it to be a perfect example of how it works in the real world. I told myself, "Thou shalt suck it up and move forward." As far as the campus staff, there are the very dedicated and the very unconcerned finance and academic advisors, and not much in between. The University has a number of scholarships, grants, credits, discounts, and other options to offer financial assistance and mitigate the impact of needing to drop a class for personal reasons. However, not all advisors pass this information along to students, so it is one area that needs improvement. The business programs are challenging if you put in the effort. You will find a lot of low-quality students in the 100 and 200-level courses because these are the easy ones, no matter where you go to school. By the time you reach your core classes, the flock of uncommitted students will have dropped out. Most students can trot right along through a management, business systems, or ethics course, but struggle with math, statistics, finance, and accounting. It may be because these particular subjects generally have right and wrong answers where most other subjects are a matter of finding a reputable source to support an opinion. What to expect: I can only vouch for the school of business. I found the course material sufficient, the library excellent, and the assignments relevant to the real world. That is more than I can say for the traditional formula used by most other schools. If you are diligent and make learning your priority, you can thrive in this environment. They will not teach you at this school. The UOP provides a structured environment, framework for your chosen program area, and materials, but the bulk of the learning is on the learner. This is not a negative; it is just college. In my opinion, it's a very modern approach and the one that most closely matches the business environment. The workload: First, there is a traditional syllabus and the requirement to use APA formatting on all papers and include proper citations. Plagiarism violations are strictly monitored and punished by academic withdrawn from the class and an F grade. Most standard 5-week courses in the bachelor's program have 3-4 individual papers, 3-4 team assignments, and 1 cumulative test. Some have quizzes or other small assignments as well. The participation requirements vary, but 6-8 posts around 200 words each per week is normal, and the length and level of difficulty varies with each course and by facilitator. The workload is sufficient to gain exposure to the most critical topics, but, as with any other school, the learner can choose to do bare minimum reading and research, or put in maximum effort. For the record, "trying it" must include more than the first 2 classes. The first course is almost worthless, so be prepared for that. It's there because a lot of people realize in that class that online learning just isn't for them, or they're not really committed to college, and they shouldn't waste their money. A word of caution before you choose to go to any school online: If you do not like to write, you will have trouble. If you cannot spell or use correct grammar and punctuation, the whole class will see it. Additionally, reading an electronic textbook may be more trying on your eyes and mind than reading paper text. Lastly, based on my experience and that of others I know, it is more difficult to go to school online than it is to complete the same course in a traditional classroom. Online is simply a convenient location. Overall Opinion: The UOP produces the same average quality of graduates as other schools. Some are superstars, some mediocre, and others just barely made it through. Some employers do care about the brand of a school, but I personally did not have trouble finding a job in the area I wanted. I received more interviews after getting my degree than prior to receiving it, and from better companies. My current and former employer were both happy with my education (my last boss was also a UOP grad). I also noticed that hundreds of employers, the military, and the VA are perfectly willing to pay for their employees to attend the UOP, so I cannot believe that "everyone knows the degree is worthless." I believe that attitude is tradition butting heads with something new that threatens the status quo. On another note, the UOP has brought in new deans to help strengthen the curriculum in each school, so I believe the experience will keep getting better and better. If anything will sink the boat it will be a failure to address the concerns so many have had with their advisors, and where I am seeing most of the negative reviews. This has to do with the administration rather than the quality of the education."
1.0 out of 5 stars
K.S - 10/10/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2014
"I hate it here they never know what they are talking about and the instructors are a waste of time. The financial department is horrible and I think they are pocketing the money for themselves. I was told one amount I would receive and now it is a whole 400 short of what it is that I was actually supposed to get. All they care about is money and at the end of my semester I am switching to a different school where the instructors will actually help you. They fool you by helping out a lot during the AA program, but once you get to Bachelors. They leave you there to dry they got the money they wanted so they do not care.DO NOT GO HERE I WASTED TWO YEAR OF MY LIFE BEING LOYAL TO THEM FOR NOTHING"
1.0 out of 5 stars
Darik Norris - 10/5/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2014
"Be very carfull if you go to this so called university. I was taking class in Fayetteville, NC, everything was going good up until they said they are closing down all the campuses and making student go online, if you didn't want to go online they said they will work with you, such as still closing the campus and making student goto a meeting room at one of the local hotels, one of the BAD/gross hotels in the city. The made it imposible to go to a computer center, as we could at the campus when it was open. Then to make things go from bad to worse they increased the tution rate. If you are deciding on a on-line university shop around, you DO WANT THIS ONE!!!!!"
3.0 out of 5 stars
dmp - 9/3/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2015
"The program is great, I feel as though I have learned a great deal of information in the past three years. I received my Associates in Accounting and am working toward my Bachelors in Business Management. With that being said, the Financial Aid department is full of incompetent people (not all of them but a vast majority.) You will never get a straight answer and if you do it is usually a lie. When you do get an answer they are usually beating around the bush and never get a true explanation of what in the world is going on. The school in general is a good school, my suggestion to you is that you keep a close eye on your finances and if at all possible avoid getting financial aid if possible."
4.0 out of 5 stars
Ashley - 8/5/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2013
"As a single mom with a full time job, an online program was the only realistic way that I was going to be able to get my degree. I was so glad to have the opportunity to do that for myself through the University of Phoenix. I had completed my Associate's on campus through our local community college and transferred into University of Phoenix for my BA. It took me about 2 1/2 years. The best part was being able to take classes at my own pace, and take time off when I needed to. An online program definitely takes more self-discipline than a campus experience, but if you have the motivation it is well worth the time and money."
2.3 out of 5 stars
L.S. - 7/31/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2015
"I am almost done, just 9 more classes to go to earn my BS Business degree and they had to change the classroom format!!! I was so confused with this new classroom tool. I'm getting the hang of it now, and realize even more that this tool was not thought through well. It is very confusing, not intuitive, and actually hinders productive communication for learning. Why did they get rid of the old classroom? It worked just fine. If they wanted to change the environment, they sure did a poor job of vetting new software."
5.0 out of 5 stars
Angie Rincon - 7/23/2014
Degree: Business
Graduation Year: 2011
"When attending UOPX both online and ground campus, I learned a great deal from the curriculum provided by the school. The instructor support was phenomenal, it was instant, and based on real world experiences. The school itself helped me with anything I needed such as tutoring, guidance, interaction, and homework support. I recommend this school to those that are looking for flexibility toward the online realm."
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