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University of Phoenix Reviews

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1211 Reviews
61%
Recommend This School
63%
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5 stars
(281)
4 stars
(587)
3 stars
(74)
2 stars
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Student & Graduate Reviews (1,211)

1 out of 5
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Degree: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2014

I hate it here they never know what they are talking about and the instructors are a waste of time. The financial department is horrible and I think they are pocketing the money for themselves. I was told one amount I would receive and now it is a whole 400 short of what it is that I was actually supposed to get. All they care about is money and at the end of my semester I am switching to a different school where the instructors will actually help you. They fool you by helping out a lot during the AA program, but once you get to Bachelors. They leave you there to dry they got the money they wanted so they do not care.DO NOT GO HERE I WASTED TWO YEAR OF MY LIFE BEING LOYAL TO THEM FOR NOTHING

4 out of 5
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Degree: English Language and Literature, General
Graduation Year: 2018

Overall, the school was okay. Regarding Financial Services, well afterall, this is a for-profit college. Given that, it is basically a business and they are out to make money. There should be a balance to almost everything, so I am advocating that a quality education should be just as important as money to this school if not more important. When seeking profit begins to overwhelm the need to render a quality education, that is where the problem lies. I did get the sense that some of the instructors were really not traditional teachers or professors who studied to educate in the field that they are teaching. This is where one may get the impression that profit overrides quality at this institution. However, I believe I did end up with a good Admissions Rep, Academic Advisor, Financial Advisor, and two out of three good instructors. One was actually an exceptionally great instructor. This Instructor I believed to actually have been more than just knowledgable in the course she taught, but actually was an educator as she reminded me of my high school AP teachers in her method of teaching. I am sad to say, or even rather upset that one of the three instructors was not lacking in educating skills, but was rather unprofessional. Teachers should not be biased when it comes to their preferences in communicating with their students. This instructor seemed to be jealous of and therefore unwilling to communicate with the students who actually seemed to be a little more advanced than others in their class. It's almost as if he was intimidated by those of who were familar with the topic and already were knowledagable with prior insight regarding the topic. He seemingly would pat the students on the back who's answers and responses to questions and discussion posts were really lacking in competence as far as legibility and validiity. Some of their answers would be so far off topic that you could tell they had not even remotely read the lesson and were just philosophically spewing out their own personal assumption or guess. But with students who intelligently and thoroughly responded with statements that asserted they had actually read the lesson, he would by pass their statements and would make an effort to respond to almost every discussion response with a "good job" but the person or persons with the correct, well-written and thought out responses. I have to say that insecure and unprofessional instructors such as mentioned have no place in instructing and being responsible for giving grades to students they have a biased against. Finally, working in groups is not such a good idea when it involves your grade is depending on others participating or one person made to be responsible for submitting an assignment for several people. Not only that, but the discussion boards themselves caused for a lot of child-like behavior with people who were more focused on the social aspect of learning than actually learning. Some even who had the same problem that the above mentioned instructor had with seemingly being intimidated by those who were putting forth their best effort which meant being as professional as they could. You would expect this in middle school and maybe even high school, but in a college class, this should not be the case being that everybody attending are adults who should be like such in their mentality as far as immaturely competing with one another when college is supposed to be about self-focus and achievement. I believe that this problem is a result of making the students respond to other student's discussion post and working in teams. In doing so, you can tell those of who some students don't like as they will continuously comment on the same students post instead of indiscriminately interacted with all of their class mates. I am a zero tolerant person when it comes to playing games. Though I didn't let it stop me from doing my best, I will say that as important and as valuable as an education is in today's society, it is so irritating to have to deal with and see petty, child like behavior in a class room full of ADULTS. I would rather be in a class or at a school where the curriculum is more individually oriented and where we simply do our assignments and turn them in. Discussions should be done only when necessary as they are in a traditional class setting where we mostly discuss the topic with and to our teacher. To sum it up, do what it best for you. If you don't mind the obstacles that I mentioned above, it might be a great personal fit for you.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2014

Be very carfull if you go to this so called university. I was taking class in Fayetteville, NC, everything was going good up until they said they are closing down all the campuses and making student go online, if you didn't want to go online they said they will work with you, such as still closing the campus and making student goto a meeting room at one of the local hotels, one of the BAD/gross hotels in the city. The made it imposible to go to a computer center, as we could at the campus when it was open. Then to make things go from bad to worse they increased the tution rate. If you are deciding on a on-line university shop around, you DO WANT THIS ONE!!!!!

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2 out of 5
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Degree: Accounting
Graduation Year: 2014

I just graduated from the University of Phoenix. I can assure you this school is all about the dollar. My experience with UOP is that I did work hard and their curriculum is difficult. I will give them that much. However, I also think accounting is universal in that every school teaches it the same way. You either learn it or you don't. I do get the sense though that UOP is very money driven. And try and get something rushed, you will speak to 5 people until that one person actually tells you the right thing. I find them to be very unorganized, especially the AA's. The PLA is also unorganized. Overall, check out other schools such as Liberty University, who provide military discounts and cheaper tuition. Stay away from UOP. Besides, where I live, it is a joke degree unfortunately.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Health Services Administration
Graduation Year: 2012

University of Phoenix is not a traditional school and that is what I needed. it fit my needs. The school practically held my hand through the hold process. I went back to school at the age of 42, not knowing how to even turn a computer on, my enrollment counselor spent over an hour of his time showing me how to use the material I needed. This does not mean that this school is perfect. I've heard bad stories from bad experiences from other students and my whole experience was not perfect but I can say that most of my bad experiences were from colleagues and maybe two instructors. I love that my schedule was set for me through the whole program. I did not have to worry of registering or finding my next class. I went back to finish a Masters' degree and I will do it again.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2015

Starting off I was nervous because it was all new but I have recieved a lot of help and I am always pointed in the right direction. Someone is just about always there when I need them. I would reccomend this school to anyone.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2016

I think before people choose to study online, they need to consider how much harder it is, especially if you have a full time job. Not only is it hard, but if you are just starting, it is usually best to consider technical schools that get right to the point, instead of taking all of these classes that cost thousands of dollars and will not benefit you in the long run. I am taking am working on getting my associates in arts of business and I have yet to take a class that has anything to do with business. I'm 6 months into it! What I can say is that, I will finish out my associates here, but I will certainly not waist my time on a bachelors with UOP. College in general is a waste of money, when you have access to technical schools all around. It is a shame that I didn't realize this prior. Live and learn! Even if they are to switch up the curriculum, it is still not worth it. You can take 7 weeks of business and then go one to reading, then critical thinking, then the lab work that they give you. It's just a messy pile that takes you all over the place.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Child Development
Graduation Year: 2014

I have had the best school experience at University of Phoenix. My academic and financial advisor were top notch and contacted me every few weeks just to check on me. However, I would contact either of them if there were any issues or just to touch base also. I naturally reach out to people. I naturally develop relationships. So perhaps my natural tendency to build relationships with people, has helped me in this environment. During my associates degree, I had the absolute best teachers! I think I only had one really rotten one. However, in my Bachelors program, I had a few really great teachers and the rest were at best, mediocre. They did what they needed to do or they graded absurdly harsh and nitpicked every single thing in a paper. I actually had a teacher count me off because I did not actually put the words "Introduction" and "Conclusion" on slides for a PowerPoint presentation. Instead, I had titled the slides "In the beginning" and "What Did We Learn" respectively. I sort of thought it was obvious that the first and last slides were what they were. But whatever. I also had a teacher give me a flat out zero on a presentation because I used animations that brought the content together on the slide and she refused to watch it in slide show mode. I was able to refute the grade and file a grievance and I ended up with an A but it was a hassle. I agree that there are not a lot of procedures in place if there is an issue or problem with a teacher. At a school you physically attend, there are actually people you can speak with face-to-face and better, more fully developed escalation of ways to resolve issues. The learning team experience was WONDERFUL! I got the absolute best team in my first Bachelor's class. We clicked so well that we submitted "Follow-A-Friend" requests with each of our advisors and we stayed together for the entire Bachelor's program. While I never met any of them, I have stayed in touch and I consider them to be genuine friends. We spoke quite often outside of the classroom experience and we were always able to count on each other. If you get a great teammate in a learning team, DO request that you follow each other. It makes ALL the difference in the learning team. Within a few classes, you will have your dream team and you will wonder what all the fuss with learning teams is. :) My biggest complaint is that because the classes are so short, I did not feel that I was able to truly immerse myself as fully as I may have liked to. However, the shorter classes were wonderful when you were taking something like statistics that I absolutely hate anyway! Just to give a little background: Getting my degrees (Associates and then Bachelors) was not exactly a cake walk. The amount of work that is required is substantial in that you must participate in writing and not just by turning in papers like a brick and mortar school. I also had two deaths in my family (grandparents) within a few weeks of each other during the middle of my Associates program and my husband and I split up over the stress of it all for a few months. I was basically a single Mom going to school full time during those months. During the end of that program, I found out I was pregnant and gave birth extremely early to a tiny baby with a congenital heart defect that had to have open heart surgery almost immediately after birth. She suffered from 10 strokes during her open heart surgery and other complications that kept us in the Children's Hospital here for almost 6 months. Thanks to the flexibility of University of Phoenix's online program, I was able to stay in school and not withdraw. Instead of starting my Master's program in a few weeks, I would be still attempting to finish an Associates program if I were having to take classes in a classroom and show up a couple of times a week in person. As it was, I was able to continue with no breaks and just keep my laptop with me. When she slept, which she did quite often because she was so ill and fighting for her life, I would do my assignments and participation. I am not going to say that I made the best grades I could have but I did the very best I could under my circumstances and I did NOT give up. Neither did my baby, by the way, she is now a happy, healthy, little stinker of a toddler and she has been our biggest blessing! Online school is not for everyone and not every online school will be the perfect fit. If you are curious, try it and see. Univ. of Phoenix is quite expensive but it was the right choice for me and I have had only wonderful experiences. I DO feel that I can have academic conversations with people about many subjects. As a result of an elective class I took, Creative Writing, I began writing outside of the classroom and have now had a story I wrote published! I feel like, despite of taking all online classes, I got a fairly well-rounded degree (Hint: choose electives that broaden your learning experience of develop skills you would like to work on - such as my creative writing class). In general, life is what you make it. Seek out additional resources. If a subject you are taking interests you, pursue it further. Learning happens both in and out of a classroom.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Beverage Management
Graduation Year: 0000

I only took one course in their masters level program and it was nowhere near master's level academic quality. Many in the class could barely write in complete sentences or handle APA formatting. In group projects I wound up pulling all the weight because of the poor quality and caliber of academics other students in the class were operating in. I stopped and went and found a real masters program at another institution that was up to appropriate academic standards. It might be ok as a vocational type school or a networking opportunity but if you was a real grad school level academic education look elsewhere. If I'm going to invest 10s of thousands and years into a supposed Masters degree, I want it to be a Masters degree not a masquerade as one. Fortunately I realized this very soon in and was able to start again at another school. Pheonix was a valuable education in the power of good advertising and what I didn't want in a degree program. It might be fine for others depending on your goals but if you want an actual academic degree with credibility in the academic world, this is not likely a place you want to choose.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Psychology, General
Graduation Year: 2016

The school appears to suffer a high turnover rate among its advisors. Some courses have gone smoothly, some haven't. For the ones that haven't, there doesn't seem to be any process in place to improve the situation. Just pretty much "ride it out", and move on to the next course. I got through the Associate's leg of my degree with few problems. But when it came to moving to the Bachelor's program, which they knew I wanted to do, no one contacted me for the transition. I ended up calling them as soon as I realized someone had dropped the ball, which ended up delaying my finances. Financial aid advisor responds as if solving problems isn't part of their job description. Overall, the program seems good, but the support is seriously lacking.

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