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Johns Hopkins University Reviews

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12 Reviews
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Student & Graduate Reviews (12)

4 out of 5
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Degree: Cognitive Science
Graduation Year: 2015

The undergrad Hopkins atmosphere is undeniably competitive, but not cutthroat. It's a fairly large school, although the campus itself isn't remarkably difficult to navigate. Hopkins has an interesting culture of 'productivity' that can be difficult to manage, but the surest way to live well in that environment is through community. If you are planning to spend your tuition money (and then some) here, commit to seeking out people who will challenge you, encourage you, and remind you of who you are. The grind is real, but so is the love.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Graduation Year: 2017

The ChemBE program is one of the most rigorous programs at Johns Hopkins. It is important to have a great work/life balance at this school. Hopkins strives to meet that balance. Hopkins also strive to prepare you for your future. It has many research opportunities that people get involved in during their freshman year (myself included). The ChemBE program is perfect for those who want to push themselves beyond their limit to see what they can accomplish.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Finance
Graduation Year: 2006

It was a nice college. The courses were challenging. The social life was okay. I wish it was in a better area.

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5 out of 5
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Degree: Cell/Cellular and Molecular Biology
Graduation Year: 2012

Hopkins is a tight-knit community where you have TONS of once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for a great education including research, internships, and travel. I entered unsure about the "intense" reputation of the students, but soon learned the vast majority of students are warm, friendly, team-players who work hard and play hard. At JHU, I made deep, meaningful friendships that will last a lifetime and had countless unique educational opportunities.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Writing
Graduation Year: 2009

Although it's known for medicine, I chose Hopkins because it had the second-best writing program in the US. There's an awesome liberal arts culture that doesn't get much outside publicity. The English and Writing Sems professors are excellent, and the theater program is run by none other than Addams Family star John Astin. There is also a huge musical community, since Peabody is under the Hopkins umbrella. Having private lessons with top-notch Peabody professors is amazing. And just because you major in the humanities doesn't mean you can't have a robust scientific experience. I worked in a lab and spent a good amount of time doing research on child cognitive development. At first, it's rough getting used to the fact that you're no longer a big fish in a small pond. Students enter feeling a bit full of themselves for getting into a good university. Most people who go there were considered top of their class in high school, and the first semester is definitely a shake-up. The first couple of months, you have a lot of bruised egos. After that, though, everything calms down and people are genuinely great. You develop an identity that's not tied to academic achievement. Socially, Hopkins is great. I'm still close friends with a lot of people from college, and I met my now-husband during our Junior year. If partying is your thing, you'll find plenty of people into that, but if partying's not your thing, you'll also find plenty of people that feel the same.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2008

Great variety and quality of courses, majors, professors and opportunities to apply knowledge.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Cell/Cellular and Molecular Biology
Graduation Year: 2015

JHU was great at helping me get into medical school and it's hard sciences are very strong. However, JHU has a few drawbacks; it has a very strong East Coast elitist culture to it (note the emphasis on lacrosse), students have very little free speech rights (note the recent fiasco caused by the university trying to stop students from founding a pro-life club) and little safety (note the university's covering up of recent rape). Having said all of that, if you keep your head down, take advantage of the great resources, and study hard, you'll end up in a good place on the other side.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2015

The Bloomberg School of Public Health has a very rigorous MSPH program that really challenges public health students and gives them practical experiences to exercise the knowledge learned in the classroom. Faculty and professors are highly invested in students as well.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2015

The Bloomberg School of Public Health has a very rigorous MSPH program that really challenges public health students and gives them practical experiences to exercise the knowledge learned in the classroom. Faculty and professors are highly invested in students as well.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Biomedical Engineering
Graduation Year: 2013

The school is great for people who are looking to get into public health. The downfall is that a lot of the teachers aren't very accessible so if you are struggling with coursework, they won't always be open or willing to meet with you in person. The major downfall is the cost of the institution and lack of aid available in the form of scholarships, grants, or tuition waivers. I am in a lot of debt because of this school.

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