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Arizona State University Reviews

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Recommend This School
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5 stars
(129)
4 stars
(123)
3 stars
(39)
2 stars
(22)
1 star
(18)
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4 out of 5
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Degree: Nurse Practitioner (Family)
Graduation Year: 2021

Arizona State University is a top notch institution. I completed my undergraduate nursing degree and am currently enrolled as a graduate student. I looked around at other schools, but ASU's program offered the best choice for my future career goals. In the nursing and advance nursing programs, they have excellent professors that are passionate about what they teach, and willing to go above and beyond for their students. Their simulation centers are state of the art, and help students practice real life scenarios. ASU has also been very competitive in their clinical site placements for nursing students. From level 1 trauma centers, to connecting students to future employment, every step of the way is crafted with the students goals in mind.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Criminal Justice
Graduation Year: 2017

This school is a joke. They require courses that suit their federally funded needs, and have little to no content that helps in the long run. They do absolutely nothing to help you succeed in internships or a future career. The guidance department watches Netflix all day, and only advocates for career programs that are out of state or pay the school for advertising. Also, the director of the school copied his speech from another speaker at my graduation. Joke!

1 out of 5
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Degree: Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians, Other
Graduation Year: 2020

ASU requires all this transcripts along with requiring an outrageous amount of money for application fee for online students plus will not even look at your transcripts until you pay the application fee. Evidently ASU cares more about money than offering a good quality education to students who want to further their career.

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1 out of 5
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Degree: Graphic Design
Graduation Year: 2021

This school has very poor communication within the Admissions department. I have received a number of messages from an admissions advisor that they need more information from me, however, I've called and emailed multiple times with none of them to be returned for over a week. The admissions process is draaaaaaaaaagggggged out at a turtle's pace, I can only image what the academia portion of this school is actually like. First impressions are huge with schools and honestly making a good first impression by Arizona state university apparently isn't a priority.

2 out of 5
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Degree: History
Graduation Year: 2021

Prepare to learn nothing. This department when this department isnt full your head with post-modernist propaganda it is grading with a chip on it shoulder. I had one professor who required 400 word posts and 250 word responses on every discussion. Another wanted to crame 5 modules into 7 weeks. All the while I felt less like I was learning and more being evaluated on what they thought I should already know.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Elementary Education
Graduation Year: 2016

Attending Arizona State University as an undergraduate was the best decision I could have made. There were other schools in mind, but ASU had the most benefits for my education. The dorm life at Arizona State University was a great experience for me! Before moving in I was connected with many freshman. It was helpful to talk to other freshman before starting because it made me less nervous to meet people and get involved once school began. The staff at Arizona State is phenomenal. I always felt supported and I always felt comfortable seeking help with school, finances, and extra curricular activities. Attending sporting events was one of my favorite experiences at ASU; it helped that we were so good! The energy level at sporting events was contagious. Even if you arent into sports there are so many activities and clubs to get involved in throughout the year. My best advice is to get out of your shell and find friends with common interests.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Human Development and Family Studies, General
Graduation Year: 2020

Arizona State University is a good online school to go to. All of he departments that I had to have contact with made sure that I was taken care of and got the help that I needed. The services that they provided for the most part were accessible when I needed them. I learned a lot from the instructors at ASU and I feel that they were beneficial to my future career choices.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Supply Chain Management
Graduation Year: 2018

This is a highly ranked program for supply chain management majors! If you are looking for a career in supply chain, look no further! ASU has outstanding faculty for this program and the resources they provide are phenomenal! Each Fall and Spring semester they have a career fair where businesses only come to hire supply chain majors. Because this is such a high ranked program, you will see all the major businesses in attendance. This program truly prepared me for what I do in my job today. I see how it has given me an advantage amongst my peers and fellow co-workers. ASUs supply chain program not only covers the basics, but will teach you skills needed for this industry. You will have opportunities to work with fortune 500 companies to evaluate and recommend solutions to their supply chain. The experience you can gain from this program will set you up to be a valuable and marketable future employee. This program also gives plenty of opportunity to work with fellow students in projects so you are always expanding your network. Finally, ASUs WP Carey School of Business is a great place to receive your education. You will be well rounded in business no matter what degree you pursue. If you do not like the program you are in, ASU is flexible and will give you one on one attention to help figure out a path you will enjoy. You will not be disappointed for making the decision to attend ASU.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services, Other
Graduation Year: 2020

I was exciting to go back to school for my Masters as I'm creeping every closer to 40. I am disabled and live in California, so of course I chose the online route, but I have been severely disappointed from the beginning. I don't know why I was surprised, but just like all corporate run state colleges, this one was no exception. They must assume that everyone is a clueless freshman that has no direction in life (not saying this applies to all freshman), as, of course, they enroll you in classes that you already know you will never use the information from in your professional career. But they get to justify it because that's just how it is and they can get away with it. It's a money grab. This is the way it's been for a very long time, but then for those classes, like Calculus I or II, they set you up to fail. Again, no logical explanation other than to force you to retake a classes and give them more money. Calculus is not a beginners math class and is in no way a subject you should be forced to take unless you already know it is used in your future career of choice. It is NOT in may case (facts based on friends and colleagues establish in the same career) and I simply do not have the brain power to memorize BS that will be useless 6 months down the road. But they have to justify filling those seats, which they couldn't do if they only offered it to people who actually needed it. They are no better than the extended warranty offered when you buy a used car. Scam. But the real problem comes when your ONLINE tests are proctored. Not only do you have to take the test with your webcam and microphone on, they apparently believe they have the right to tell you to not have any music on, rearrange your office or desk so that there are no other materials anywhere in sight, and don't talk out loud. Basically, they want to control every facet of you home life when taking their class. It is a GROSS invasion of privacy and unnecessary control. You literally have to pick up your laptop or camera and show them all around the room, forcing their way into your home. Unbelievable. If you are a stay-at-home parent with a baby to take care of, probably the reason you chose online courses to begin with, then apparently you need to lock your baby in a closet, otherwise you'll get an email about rules violations while taking the test and the noises from the baby that can be heard. I have a dog and he has issues and growls at times. *Rule Violation! Sorry school, you don't have the right to tell me I need to spend money on a sitter, that I don't have. As far as I am concerned, they do NOT have the right to tell you how you recall information or how you study, so it's become a joke now and as far as I am concerned their rules hold no value. I continue to talk to myself, that's how I recall and study, I am no longer concerned for their opinion of it. And to be clear, these things were NOT discussed in any capacity as I enrolled in the school, paid the overpriced application fee and spend time submitting all required documentation. It is only revealed AFTER you enroll in the class and become aware of their test taking policy. You know, when it's a little late to back out. Just be warned and think about your reasons for taking the online route. You privacy will be violated, you will have to re-think the way you study, the way you recall information etc etc. And while we're on the subject, shouldn't schools get with the times? No company worth their weight will ever limit an employee to only using information that they have memorized. Any good manager will provide their employees with all the resources they need to get their job done, whether it is reference material, notes, etc etc. So why do school insist that you don't use notes when taking tests? Having notes is no guarantee that you will ace anything, you still have to understand what you are referencing, but they care more about outdated memorizing than actual learning. The only logical explanation is they desire to set their students up to fail, thereby forcing those that did not eagerly await this class, to fail, and pay them more money to retake it. Look at a picture of any scientist in their lab/office. What do you see? Books and notes, everywhere. And it's literally rocket science for some. So, in conclusion. You are far better off just paying the monthly fee at Cousera, and learning on your own terms. Our school system is outdated and as can clearly been seen in recent news, just as corrupt as any bank or government agency. Do yourself a favor and save both stress and money and seek alternate solutions. I have been very happy with my representative at the school, but that's about it. This is 2019 and the videos (the real teachers) are from 2012. I have pointed out 3 errors to date and clearly they will not be changed, further setting up unsuspected students to failure. Very, very disappointed.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Human Development and Family Studies, General
Graduation Year: 2018

Arizona State University is a thriving University. There are an incredible number of programs and the advisers are wonderful in helping your find the right program for you and your career goals. The campus is spacious with unlimited resources to their students. Between the online options and the in-class courses, you can find just about anything schedule you need to be successful. The teaching staff is great and the courses are easy to maneuver with very detailed syllabuses. There is also a variety of financial aid available to incoming freshman with a competitive GPA. I would recommend Arizona State as a valid option for anyone that wants versatility, support, and opportunities in their education.

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