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Full Sail University Reviews

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2 out of 5
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Degree: Video Game Design
Graduation Year: 2019

I never write reviews for anything but this is one that I cannot ignore. I went on campus for the first half of my degree which to say was alright until you slip up and then it is a downfall from there. My fourth month, my grandmother died and while they understood that I was grieving they didn't extend my deadlines. I had to retake the class and that devastated me, I never failed at anything but I sucked it up and retook the class and let's just say for a 20 month degree it's taken me almost 30 months to get this degree and it might be even longer now because the last class that I'm currently taking now just gave a 0 on a 25% of my grade project. Most of the instructors are either new to teaching or just got out of the degree themselves. They give conflicting feedback that was fine one month but is a sin the next just for it to be okay the one after that. No one is on the same page and either the classes are extremely easy or ridiculously hard. I once was on a class with a boy had insomnia and the teacher told him that was a great thing to have. WHAT? I have to have a freakin' disorder to pass a class. I have drank so much caffeine to stay up with this classes that my husband has had to, on multiple occasions, rip energy drinks out of my hands and throw away all the coffee in the house. Even my doctor told me I had to stop at one point because I'm too young to have as high as a blood pressure as I do. I'm 20 and I have almost been in CARDIAC ARREST more than once from the mix of stress and caffeine. I know as soon as I'm free of this hellhole, I will have nightmares long after. The hours are ridiculous, the criteria changes drastically from month to month, the instructors are no help, and the assignments are bogus. Just buy the equipment and programs and learn it yourself. Literally the only great thing that has happened there for me was finding my husband and he quit there after a year too and he was a veteran. He got to go on his bill, all expenses paid and he said the pressure of being in the navy was less stressful than this.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Game and Interactive Media Design
Graduation Year: 2015

This comes from the bottom of my heart. Full Sail has amazing staff but it will ruin your life if you cant get a scholarship. How you expect to get into the game industry with 80-100k of debt? The game industry is centered in some of the most expensive places in the world. You wouldnt even be able to afford to live in a cardboard box with that kind of debt in Cali or Vancouver. I have lived with parents for 3 years yet make over 50k a year. In fact I make much much more than that. And I can barely afford to keep my car fixed and have enough food in the fridge. My first loan kicked in the day I got my first job acceptance and it wasnt even a job in games. Now I have a better paying job and am still an indentured debt servant despite paying over 1000 dollars a month. My first student loan interests rates on my private loans had interests rates close 10 percent on some of the loans. Do you know how much a loan over 80k accumulates with that interest rates of 8-10 percent? Its attendance policy is ruthless and designed to take your money and repay classes. Theres is virtually no dorms, the compus is gaudy when all they need is to focus on the essentials needed to be the best in your field. (Hope that giant TV they have was worth it). If you genuinely want to get into games remember that you can literally go anywhere else and as long as you put in 8 hours a day just like full sail makes you then you probs end up just as good. I regret the decision I made when I was younger to go to full sail and if I can stop whenever is reading this from making the same mistake that will cost them the best years of their life then maybe Ive done some good.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Audiovisual Communications Technologies/Technicians, Other
Graduation Year: 2017

I see and hear all the time "you get out what you put in" but at this school its not true. You put in hours and years of time and thousands of dollars for your degree because you want to have abetter life, but all you geg is years wasted and thousands in debt. I graduated salutatorian with a 3.5 gpa and was told by many jobs I was unqualified. I used their career advisors with 0 success because its basically them using sites like indeed to "help" student find a job. I would know because the list they gave me was the same jobs i found on indeed which was the same companies that told me i was unqualified. On top of that i was a self taugh audio engeer but went to full sail because i wanted to be better and whats better than a degree in what you love, right? I wont tell you not to go to this school, i would suggest looking at all options to see if a degree is needed for what you want to do

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2 out of 5
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Degree: Internet Marketing
Graduation Year: 2017

This school bills on the semester rather than the classes you actually take. Meaning that if you start a course and decide its not for you, You will be billed for that SEMESTER, not the one or two lousy courses you took. I used my entire GI bill here and had an overall pleasant and challenging experience for Computer Science. However when I found out my GI Bill would only cover half the course of my certificate program I stopped hoping I wouldnt be charged, Long story short I am holding a bill for 1875.00 a year Later. BILL BY SEMESTER = you pay for services you have yet to/ or never received.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Video Game Design
Graduation Year: 2022

I must say Full Sail has beaten up my expectations.By those means the instructors don't teach you anything.You rely in info out of books written by game design authors.The teachers on the phone aren't friendly and have smart remarks.The chatting system such as discord are their for questions to your instructor despite that they might come at you like if you're sick they'll be like no it was due and that's it for the tests.The tests online aren't retakeable at full sail.I had three teachers fail me and only one to pass me for having two classes with him.If you're looking to be taught by a "real one" and not by your unprofessional self then go to another university then.Good luck.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Cinematography and Film/Video Production
Graduation Year: 2018

This school is awful unless you can devote 110% to them (meaning you better not have a full-time job or a family or a social life). If you do, you better get PERFECT grades. I failed a couple classes, but retook them and passed all except one class. I told the school that I have Bipolar Disorder; I'm on medication but sometimes there are days that I just can't do daily tasks because of the depression that comes with it. I explained that I have a desire to get good grades and proved that I could by passing the classes that I previously failed. This was unacceptable to them. Then they kicked me out of the school before my appeals were even done. I received an email a few days after I learned I was kicked out, asking to talk about what steps I could take to continue classes. I'm already kicked out, why are you trying to ask me what I want to do to continue? Don't waste your money on this school. The teachers there don't even teach you anything. You just do a bunch of reading on your own and fill out some papers or do a project that's going to take weeks to finish, plus at least three other things you have to do that week. I was so excited to attend this school and they just killed my dreams. And this happens to multiple students, it's not just an isolated incident. I have friends who went through the same shit. It's not right and it's a shame. Full Sail doesn't teach you anything that you can't learn on your own. It's a joke.

2 out of 5
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Degree: Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia
Graduation Year: 1998

Do not attend this school. Full Sail has fancy installations but the education is mediocre. You will graduate as a Jack of all trades: you will know a lot about many things but will not be good at any. Basically a mediocre education. Full Sail likes to accept anybody and graduate everybody, their classes are not demanding, they are easy so anybody can pass. It is a money machine. All their degrees are already obsolete in the industry, it will take you like 5 years to start making about $25 an hour and you will have to compete in a field that is flooded with people with experience and portfolio. My recomendation is for you to get a real degree in a real university, here it will take you some 10 years to "sort of be ok". Yes, they have students with Oscars and Grammys... look at the resume of those people and you will see Full Sail was one of the schools they attended. I graduated back in 1998 and I got jobs from my previous degree in Audio Engineering from a previous school and I had to take some others certifications in marketing and project management to be competitive in the industry. Go to a serious graphic design school, go to a serious social communication school, it will be cheaper and you will be a professional, not a pretentious lower life form wannabe.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Music Production
Graduation Year: 2017

I'm gonna make this simple. I enrolled, got the books but decided within two weeks of class starting that this school was not for me. Now they are coming after me for $20k. I didn't attend any classes and they think I'm going to pay them as if I did....nope not happening, what a joke. Beware!

2 out of 5
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Degree: Sports Communication
Graduation Year: 2020

Please do not go to this school as they really dont care about you! I was dealing with an online enrollment guide to get me set up to go here, and she was giving attitude towards me asking questions. Of course, we are going to have questions before signing documents as this is a big step for people.

1 out of 5
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Degree: Video Game Design
Graduation Year: 2016

Do not attend this school, full stop. The online courses are a complete joke. They talked about how difficult the online courses were to pass because of the accelerated nature of the program. Here's the issue, I went into that program already having received a Bachelors Degree from a traditional four year school, with a minor in my field, and I passed the admittance tests and got accepted into a Masters program within my field. I skipped a series of courses within my field and took a 2nd year, 600 level course to test the waters at the Masters level where I was at and I passed with an A. So the idea that I would run into problems because of the pace, complexity, or dedication required to succeed in their online courses was irrelevant, I had the educational background, work ethic to prove I could handle a self-maintained online program. And I did, much in spite of the glaring failings of the program itself. If you succeed at Full Sail's online offerings you will succeed against the grain because the programs are not designed to equip you, educate you, or properly challenge you, they're designed to take your money for as little effort as possible. It's worth noting a couple of things: 1. Full Sail does not offer classes a la carte, meaning you MUST sign up for large swathes of expenses at a time without the recourse of changing your mind part way through. This means if you get 2 classes into a 6 class block, realize you made a mistake and want to stop going, you're financially committed to all of those other classes. Does a company that has faith in it's own product offer programs in this manner? Your contractual obligations should not be the reason why you continue to give a company money, it should be because of the quality of the product or service. By design, Full Sail is after your money, not your quality education. 2. The "instructors" are not professors. They do not want you to call them professors, they want you to call them instructors. At first this appears like a nice, convenient, warm way of referring to one another that makes the "instructor" more approachable. However you will quickly realize the instructors are largely unqualified to be called professors, they rarely have more than the level of education you're trying to attain. It's expected that a person instructing a Bachelor's level class would at minimum have a Master's level of education to draw from. At Full Sail, however, you will find people who graduated from Full Sail's own bachelors and associates programs only to come back into the fold as instructors of the same programs they graduated from. What does this remind you of? That's right, a pyramid scheme. These people who wind up as "instructors" at their online offerings are not interested in investing in a new wave of students, they're working effectively part time to make ends meet because they couldn't find success elsewhere. It really does show through, too, because the instructors are disinterested in their programs, following the same, month to month, cookie cutter curriculum so they can get paid, and rarely take student complaints seriously. 3. The courses are designed poorly and rarely revised. In one of my offerings I ran into a question on the very first test that completely stumped me. I had read through all of the material, watched all of the videos, studied the concepts, and still this question completely stumped me. I anguished over it, tried to deduce what the answer could be from the test itself, and still I took a guess on it. Come to find out the "instructor" who made the test put that question on there out of order. I realized this because the VERY NEXT CHAPTER WE WERE ASSIGNED AFTER THE TEST HAD THIS QUESTION INTRODUCED AS CONTENT FOR THE FIRST TIME. I was frustrated and when I informed the instructor he brushed it off by saying, "Eh, if anyone complains about it at the end of the month and their grade is close I'll fudge the lines and give them the next grade up." Is that someone who cares about you, as a student? Is that someone who takes pride in the quality of their own work? They let content run roughshod through their students without caring if their prepared to deal with it and then only if they recognize it was an issue, complain, and are deemed close enough in grade to matter by the already apathetic instructor, then they'll get an adjusted grade later. No, this is not a quality course run by a quality instructor and the next month I saw students complaining about the same question from the same test on a Facebook student group forum. And you know what? We got push back because we were helping those students. The Facebook group moderator had to post a message that talking about specific questions wasn't allowed and that they got flak from the Full Sail administrative staff because of it. Yeah, the student wouldn't have even had to post that question if the instructor cared enough to revise their materials after being informed that they were a problem. 4. Poor group performances. Do not be surprised to see 60% or more of your fellow classmates fail from one class to the next, for reasons I've already described. Go ahead and ask your on-boarding personnel what the graduation rates are and they'll say they do not have that information. Thankfully the internet does, it's one of the first non-advertisement hits on a Google search: https://go.fullsail.edu/2017-graduation-rates Go ahead and take a look at these rates. Whether you're talking about on campus or online programs they are wildly fluctuating and dip as low as 18%, with regular 40-60% graduation rates. You have to ask yourself why that is. Why can a school bring in 100 people into a program that 80 people will leave by the end? Are they not vetting their students properly, setting them up for failure and continued financial obligation? Is it really just a matter of "get good" because the material is that "rigorous?" Take it from someone who has achieved two degrees and gone on to test out of Masters level programs, the failure rates at Full Sail are not because the program material is too dense or complex. It's because the instructors are not professors, the courses are not properly designed, the school is not interested in your success, and the financial model makes Full Sail a winner regardless of your individual outcome. 5. My personal experience. I wanted to provide good, verifiable reasons for why Full Sail is a garbage school and not worth your time. What I realized after having gone there is that taking courses online in a fast paced manner to reach my own success can already be done. Go check out Udemy, edX, or similar online course offerings that allow you to study at your own pace to acquire the knowledge you want. Want to be a programmer? Go check out https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/find-by-topic/ to find all of MIT's course material posted free and open source. From lectures and assignments to video lectures and examples. With the amount of free, properly designed, rigorous material already out in the wild on the internet you will find that your success at Full Sail can easily be replicated outside of Full Sail for either no cost or an absolute fraction of the cost. I began to realize all of this about 6 months into my courses. I had done the assignments, watched the lectures, made the videos, done everything I was supposed to do. Then I got into my first game design class where we had this sandbox style assignment where the "instructors" provided an easily accessible framework of variables to ascribe to Unity models in game. Wanted to make a wall that applied physics to an object on touch? Create the condition of "on touch" and "result is force in a given direction." You could get as creative as you wanted to with it. I read the ENTIRE rubric, watched all of the examples, did all of my homework and created my assignment to meet the highest scoring points possible. I put in the number of scene transitions, game objects, physics objects, etc. that I needed to pass the assignment with flying colors. I even read the portion of the assignment notes that stated the intent, the purpose of the assignment was not to make a fully shippable product, it wasn't meant to be a full on video game that was polished. They actually included in the intro to the assignment that it was meant to be a rough product with tools that the instructors gave us to meet the requested assignment outcomes. So I realize that my Unity objects are not easily editable in groups, if I create a Unity object that serves one purpose, has one set of pre-made variables on it, then duplicate it, and want to adjust the whole batch I have to go one by one to edit the whole batch. That seemed excessive and ridiculous. One of the tests of a proper design is how scalable it is and how easily modifiable it is as a finished product. You shouldn't have to build your scene from the ground up because you want x object to have a y variable associated with it. If you can't make changes throughout the build without encountering a massive rework problem, then you should have seen that coming from the start and given yourself the leeway needed. So I did, I assigned tons of open variables to my objects so I could modify them on the fly without having to tear it all down and start over. I built the thing, I exported the Unity project as a fully realized video game (albeit it was only two scenes), and I tested it on fresh Unity builds to see if it would work when importing it. In other words, whether importing the Unity scenes into the engine itself or playing it as an executable, the thing worked. I submitted my assignment and went to bed feeling wildly accomplished with myself. It was my first real design project and I blew it out of the water. Then I got an email reply from my "instructor" who made some BS claim that the project wouldn't open. I had to resubmit it for a late grade of 10% off. I lost my mind when he said that because I knew exactly what he was talking about. Their tools they gave us, the "Generic Behaviors," caused a problem when trying to load the Unity scenes in a fresh build. You had to first import settings to interact with the Unity scenes and allow it to run. All of this information I provided when I submitted my assignment, I told them how to make my scenes run and that their Generic Behaviors caused this problem. It was literally as simple as going into your Unity menu, scrolling down, and making the adjustment. It was something like 2 or 3 clicks away and the thing loaded properly. It's worth noting that the tools they gave me to make the assignment with caused this problem and if you loaded the exported, executable version of that file that had these settings in the final build it worked. So I did make a program that worked, the assignment made no mention of this issue having relevance to the final grade, and I know this because I read through all of the assignment requirements before making it. It didn't say anything about working without having to adjust the native Unity settings, instead it made a point of stating the importance of accepting an imperfect project because it wasn't intended to be a Gold version of a video game ready to ship tomorrow. So whether by the spirit of the assignment or by the written rules of the assignment I made a program that worked and they screwed me on it. I know what happened, the sleep-deprived, caffeine junky of an instructor who opened my assignment didn't get it to work immediately, didn't bother looking at my notes or making a good-faith effort to examine the game as is, and then because it was too hard to do his job as an actual educator just sent me a reply that punished me for something that was out of my control. Do you want to know how ridiculous this whole issue was? I recorded myself opening the game after making the appropriate setting adjustment, played it, and showed on my recording that the game worked. I had video evidence that they were wrong, that it did work, that I did my assignment correctly. I talked to my Full Sail student liaison about it and he was blown away. He was sad, I could hear it in his voice, because the same BS I was running into is the same BS every student runs into. Unclear assignments, poorly constructed course materials, disinterested, under qualified "instructors," and the ultimate goal of stroking one another's egos in an insular educational environment where they only care if they get your money. My liaison was just as confused, frustrated, and annoyed as I was. The head of the program who made the course defaulted to supporting his instructor, because of course he would, and told me to brush it under the rug and move on. They actually praised my assignment because it was a fun, well designed ball game with enjoyable controls and a nice couple of levels to interact with. That's right, they told me I had a fun design that met all of the rubric standards they set out for my first ever game design assignment but because the jackass who was in charge of opening and reviewing my assignment didn't bother to learn how to open it properly I got screwed. Even after showing them with a video that it could be opened by adjusting a setting on the native Unity engine and reiterating that this requirement was NOT a part of the original assignment (i.e. it did not say on the rubric it must work under these sorts of conditions) I still got down graded. They patted me on the back and told me to move onto the next assignment, to pay more attention and do better next time. That was the most insulting thing they could have said, because I did read the materials they offered, I did make it according to their exact requirements. They had no caveat about leaving dead, unused Generic Behavior variables on objects. They made no mention of what Unity settings it had to run under. They just threw me under the bus instead of admitting they had a poorly designed and instructed course. I was so burned by it that I left the school, I didn't even finish the rest of my already paid for courses. I cut ties with them. And you know what? My student liaison also cut ties with them. He told me on our recorded phone call it had nothing to do with how disappointed he was regarding my horrible experience being abused by the instructors. But you know what? I could hear it in his voice when we spoke on the phone, he was wildly disappointed when he was trying to get my penalized grade overturned and he sounded like a much happier individual when he told me he was leaving the company. That's what it is, after all, it's a company after your money. So perhaps my story wasn't the exclusive reason he left, perhaps it's the culture of under qualified, disinterested, poorly designed, poorly instructed, and financially motivated snake-oil salesmen that breeds my kind of stories and interactions that told him to leave. Yes, you can be successful AT Full Sail, but you will only be handicapping yourself by attending. Any amount of success you would have had with Full Sail you would have realized more fully without Full Sail. Do NOT attend this school.

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