Search Reviews by College:

American InterContinental University Reviews

94% of users found this page helpful Was this page helpful?
65%
Recommend This School
64%
Degree Improved Career
Search over 211,000 programs:

Student & Graduate Reviews (159)

2 out of 5
-

NOT military friendly! Classes are very expensive and fast paced. They have no tolerance for late assignments regardless of the reason, even if they say it will be acceptable.

I am active duty military and went to this school because they informed me that they were very military friendly. I am stationed overseas and on occasion I don't have internet access. The admissions advisors assured me that it wouldn't be a problem that I just needed to let them know and I would be given more time to complete the projects. I was notified that I would be out for a couple weeks by my commander so I notified the school, they told me no problem. Then when I attempted to submit my assignments late, I received a failing grade and they told me that the submissions were past the deadline. I appealed it all the way through the Vice-President and the decision stood.

I don't see how this school can claim to be military friendly and not give me any kind of consideration when a situation beyond my control arose. They took the money for my class from the military and then I had to pay the army back for the class. I would not recommend this school to anyone, they only care about your military benefits or the Pell grants they get from the government. This is strictly for profit organization.

5 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2012

This school makes sense. The curriculum is designed around real life scenarios that can help you with your job. People try and discredit this school because of the instructors, but it's no different than any other college. Some are good and some are bad. I got my BA there and I'm getting my MBA there right now. I feel as if I've earned my degree and that I learned a lot.

4 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2004

Over the years of online browsing, I have read a lot of negative comments about AIU and decided it was time to put in my own two cents worth. I will try to cover the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Keep in mind that my experience was with a master’s degree. I don’t know about their undergraduate programs. I found the courses to be very challenging. There is a lot of reading and a lot of writing. Courses only last for five weeks and most courses had at least two textbooks to cover in that time period, plus multiple assignments, papers to write, and a group project to complete. You will almost certainly reach a burnout point somewhere in the middle, but you just have to take a breath, remind yourself of the end goal and regroup. It wouldn’t be worth it if it were easy, would it?

For me, it was worth it. I learned a lot. I have heard others, who attended other colleges, say that they learned nothing practical in their degrees—everything important was learned on the job. That was not the case for me. Almost all of the assignments were designed to teach what you would actually need to know on the job, and you tailored your projects to fit your own career.

Each week there was a mandatory interactive lesson online. The lesson was short but very well done. Also, each week, the instructors were required to schedule two sessions, either in the chat room, or through audio, to give opportunity to interact with the students in real time. Attendance was optional. The session was recorded and available for review at a later time.

As with any college (and, believe me, I hopped around in my undergrad degrees, so I know), there will be some instructors you like better than others. I had one instructor who never gave me credit for an assignment I turned in and ignored my emails, which kept me from finishing with a 4.0 GPA. With that one exception, all of my instructors were excellent, and available to answer questions and explain assignments. That last was important because some of the assignments were not written very clearly. Hopefully, they have since been edited.

I could not have been more pleased with my classmates. We were in a Masters of Education program (Instructional Technology) so my classmates were professional educators from around the country, some in K-12 and some in higher education. Through the discussion board and the group projects, I learned from them. In my undergrad degree, I was the one who carried almost all of the weight in group projects so it was a relief to be with a group of people who were willing to shoulder their share of responsibility. There was one exception, of course, but she did not make it through the program. It was not easy coordinating meeting times with classmates in other time zones, but that is a skill needed in today’s workplace. We made it work. Another thing I appreciated about my classmates is that we all recognized that there would be times when life or burnout would keep us from doing as much on a particular project as we normally would. As long as we kept the communication open and did our share overall, we accepted this and were willing to make allowances.

So much for the good. There are a couple of things that left a bad taste in my mouth. When I started, the AIU website and online student handbook specifically stated that we could attend graduation, if we chose, at any of AIU’s brick and mortar campuses. The website promoted that as a selling point to prospective students. However, when the time came, they not only did not honor that, saying it was too expensive for the campuses to accommodate all the online students. It would not have been a big deal (as least, not to me) if they had just said they changed the policy. But, instead, they flat out lied to us. A number of us had phone and email communication with the administration about it and they claimed it had never been their policy to allow attendance at a physical graduation. Of course, all references had been removed from the website, but we all remembered it being there. It makes you wonder what else they would lie about.

The other negative was their placement service. You expect to get little or no help from most not-for-profit schools but more is expected from for-profit schools who make placement assistance a selling point to prospective students. (Keep in mind this was quite a few years ago—I don’t know how they do it now.) I was already working in higher education but not in my field of study so I was looking for a change. I finally called the Career Services department in exasperation after they sent me yet another job announcement about a business looking for a data entry clerk (for someone with a master’s degree in education???) I told the career counselor I wanted to know about only jobs in my field and I didn’t care what part of the country. She said their system wasn’t set up that way. Apparently they just copied any job, no matter the relevance, that was anywhere in your home state and only in your home state. I don’t think I ever got one job lead from them relevant to my degree.

Fortunately, I did not need their placement assistance. Eventually, I moved up the ladder at the college where I was working and did end up in my career field without having to go anywhere else. My pay increased by over $20k per year so the investment I made in my education did pay off. In spite of the negatives I mentioned, I would highly recommend AIU. The courses were excellent. There was none of the hassles with scheduling or purchasing books that you go through at other colleges. All of that is taken care of automatically. The cost was lower than at other colleges I compared—especially when you factor in books and fees that you pay elsewhere.

Search over 211,000 programs:
1 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: did not finish, I left

I thought I can finish with this school. I can not believe some of the instructors i had. I think they pulled them from the street. The instructor speak about the homework only. You learn nothing from them.very bad reputation,when I tell people that I go to American Intercontinental university, they say "what is that?". I am like it is online school. They say it sounds like a hotel man!!!

2 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2011

I graduated in 08/2011 with my Associates in Business Administration- Focus in IT Administration. I WILL NOT be pursuing my education with AIU due to the low quality "fast food" educational curriculum offered at almost $25K. IT WAS NOT WORTH IT WHATSOEVER! I am searching for other schools to pursue my Bachelors. AIU is an institution that utilizes Federal Education Loans to profit at the expense of a low quality, "accelerated" (drive thruogh) degree program. If you want a degree without the knowledge at overpriced credits, go for it. If you value knowledge and want what you pay for, RUN!!!

5 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2013

I chose this school becuase the student services and counseling was more than I expected. Each person gave me individual attention and guidance, where having been to a on-site college, I did not get the same assistance. In fact, my daughter attends one of the largest universities and her counselor just told her to check out the web site that it had all the information she needed. Which was a lie.

The expense of this school is much cheaper than a on-site school. You do not have the additional fees you are expected to pay for (student association, computer fees, parking, etc, books). You are told up front by the instructor what is expected and given some great challenges. There are many labs to help you to pass your classes and graduate successfully from the school. I checked this school and it is an accredited college. So no bunk here.

4 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2014

I have been a student at AIU online since Jan 2011. I chose this route because I am a single, working parent and I know that if I want to get further in my career, I need more education. Taking courses here online are most convenient for me because of my working schedule and home life.

I searched around for different online universities and what made my decision was my admissions advisor. She wasn't like any of the other experiences that I had where they were pushing for you to join their college. She was and has always been upfront and honest with me throughout my time here. AIU's cost for credit hour are about 150 dollars less than Kaplan and I believe with Univ of Phoenix.

I chose AIU because I don't have to worry about an uncredible education. When I apply for those jobs, I am very confident that AIU is on their list of credible educators. I have the choice to take 2 courses at a time to shorten how long it will take to reach my BBA or I can take 1 class at a time. It's very flexible, just depends on one's schedule. The courses are 5 weeks at a time. With 10 weeks on and 1 week off. The only real break is over christmas but your constantly going through the whole year.

As far as my experience in the virtual campus; I find it very easy to navigate through. The library is right there as well as library assistants to help find sources. I enjoy that I can choose to learn the curriculum how I want. There is the MUSE technology that is a summary of the chapters; pointing out the main parts of study using video and powerpoint presentations. There is audio for auditory learners, and of course the old trusty text book (ebook).

I have been lucky enough to have some very helpful instructors that really care about student success, while some others seem to just be there to collect a paycheck and are not helpful at all. I have received very detailed critiques on my assignments from instructors while others just respond with the generic grading rubric text as a critique.

But just because online is a learning avenue, doesn't mean that it's easier than sitting in class. It's very easy to get behind because there is so much reading to do. This is the end of my break week and I peeked in on my new class and there are 6 chapters for the assigned reading for the Unit 1 assignment, which I am reading now to get a head start. If you don't like tons of reading, I don't suggest anyone to take online courses. You have to have a heightened discipline about yourself and a want to be successful.

Some of the classes have group projects at the end. I do not like group projects because of the slackers. Everything seems to be put on one person that carries the weight of the assignment and when it's almost complete before the midnight deadline, others that have not participated all week want to come in and change things at the very last minute so that they can get a grade when they have done nothing. I don't like being piggy backed on so keep that in mind and carry your own weight.

AIU is a good school and it's not fair to throw salt on their reputation for those that think good grades will be handed to them without doing the work just because it's online. I know I work my butt off making the grade and have been able to hold a 3.5 GPA since I've started. For anyone struggling and has come across this; one thing my admissions advisor told me was to approach my assignments with things in my life that I can relate to. It really does work, just open your mind.

Good luck to those that embark on this path and just make sure that you read and understand all of the directions. It's not rocket science but if your unsure, ask your instructor. Even though the turn around for emails and voicemails is 48 hours, you will get a response but don't wait til the last minute to speak up. That's your fault.

4 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2007

Yes, the enrolment is done aggressively but I have been enrolled at one other faculty and was in contact with several other schools and they are ALL aggressive!

I got my bachelor and my MBA from AIU and overall, it worked very well for me. Main reason for me to join AIU was the short programs. It is really intense with 6 weeks classes and 13 months for a degree but I'd rather power through than drag it out forever. The instructors were quite engaged and helpful. If anything on the quality was lacking it was the fellow students in your class and group assignments which have a tendency to slack off...

Yes, the price tag is steep but the shorter duration of their program made it worthwhile for me.

The online setup, tools, discussions, sessions and library are really good. I would recommend AIU to anyone who is highly motivated, self efficient and wants a degree fast.

4 out of 5
-
Graduation Year: 2007

In the beginning I was unsure of my ability to do the work required to graduate and work two jobs. But I was desperate to earn a degree in an effort to improve my eligibility to compete and obtain a higher paying position with my agency. I was able to graduate and did obtain a higher paying, more satisfying position with my agency.

I recommend it to all adults with restricted schedules who have to drive to achieve a better standard of living, and the focus to stay on track. It was not easy, but what I experienced and learned in the virtual class of students and professors from all over the world, I could not in the traditional class room. Online learning take dedication, you cannot sit in the back of the class and hope that the teachers don’t call on you. You must be actively involved in the study and class discussions throughout the term.

1 out of 5
-

The worst school ever!!!! Instructors are not qualified to do the job. Truly bad name, bad school, bad administration. ONLY good to collect the money. Bad reputation. Too expensive for nothing. I am still paying for one course I took with them……. Leave it alone. The admission people are great in persuading you; don’t fall into the trap……

Search over 211,000 programs:
Thank you for your vote! Was this page helpful?
94% of 154 users found this page helpful.
Disclaimer: GradReports makes student reviews available via this site. The views expressed by users do not necessarily reflect the views of GradReports. GradReports takes no position with respect to the information or opinions expressed in the user comments/reviews and is not responsible for their content. For additional information, refer to our Review Guidelines.
This icon indicates that a school offers annual tuition for $15,000 or less. Tuition figures reflect the most recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics or data provided by an official representative of the school.