California State University-Northridge Reviews

  • 53 Reviews
  • Northridge (CA)
  • Annual Tuition: $18,773
86% of 53 students said this degree improved their career prospects
92% of 53 students said they would recommend this school to others
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Student & Graduate Reviews

Ali Omidfar
  • Reviewed: 2/18/2020
  • Degree: Electrical Engineering
  • Graduation Year: 2020
"This review is specifically for Electrical Engineering students. It is the most unorganized most miserable department on campus. No one is assigned an advisor, no one helps students with what classes they need to take. You're on your own and need to guess what you need to take. I once sent 19 emails to get a response and get a form signed from the chair. They cancel classes every semester and some classes are only offered in one section even though there are 50+ people that try to crash. There are FAR better colleges out there. This place is only good for last resort."
B K
  • Reviewed: 8/20/2019
  • Degree: Film Production
  • Graduation Year: 2020
"I was accepted to the CSUN MFA program in 2018 and took part in it for a full year; however, I recently decided not to go back and complete the program's second year... for a number of reasons. 1) LACK OF NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES. This was my main peeve with the program. Networking opportunities were non-existent, unfortunately. I asked a few of the professors and the head of the program about this aspect of the MFA many times - as it is crucial to a career in screenwriting - and I was never given a solid answer. I happen to know a few people/execs in the industry as well, who asked me to reach out to CSUN on their behalf because they had internship/job opportunities that they wanted to share with the school. When I gave them the dept. head's contact info, two of them told me they reached out to him and never received a response whatsoever. I followed up with the dept. head and he simply said, "Oh, yes, I do remember seeing that name... Please have them email me again." But by that time, the opportunities were long gone. This is key because not only are you required to find an internship and take an internship course during your last semester of the MFA, but it's also a very important part of the job and working in Hollywood. I know the UCLA and USC have amazing opportunities in this regard; but, alas, I applied to each of those schools and couldn't get in. 2) STRICTLY PEDAGOGIC. The program is much more tailored to those who want to teach screenwriting at the college level than it does for those who actually want to be screenwriters. I say this not only because of my previous reason - lack of networking - but also because I spoke to one of the profs who's been there since the inception of the program who told me as much outright. Additionally, there was a lot of repetition in many of the lessons we learned. 3) VERY STRUCTURE-BASED COURSEWORK. I'm all for studying structure and form, but I also think that people entering a screenwriting Master's program should have a fairly good handle on that before joining. One of the professors who taught two of our courses over the first year taught his very-specific, step-by-step breakdown of how to break a story using his unique concept. It was very specific and odd, and we spent a LOT of time focusing on only his method, when there are dozens out there, many of which have proven to be great! I actually really liked this prof on a personal level, but I do not like that 2 of the 7 course I paid for dealt entirely with his methods and didn't allow for exploration of the many other forms. 4) LOOSE SYLLABI. Unfortunately, about 2 of the 7 courses that were taught didn't have syllabi at all, or really seem to have much of a purpose. In our teaching for screenwriting course, there were 14 of us. Basically, two of us came in each class and gave a lesson each week, and the prof provided very minimal feedback at the end of each lesson. It was like we weren't being taught anything at all. The lessons were all lead by other students in my peer group, and while some of them were great, I didn't expect to have to pay for and take valuable time (driving and attending) out of my nights to listen to other students speculate on what the best way to do _____ might be. TAKE AWAY: If you don't know anything about screenwriting at all at this point in your life, OR if you're set on teaching screenwriting someday, this might be a good program for you. But if you're looking for industry connections and opportunities, save your money and look elsewhere (unless they revamp the program sometime in the next few years). The best part of the first year of the program, in my opinion, happened to be the two courses we took with adjunct professors who had real-life experience working in writers rooms. They were able to provide excellent feedback and guidance while we were working on our one-hour spec and half-hour original comedy pilots, and I feel that I can take those samples away and actually put them to use. When I joined this program, I'd already studied screenwriting as an undergrad a bit, and worked some in the industry. I'd written a few episodes for an Emmy-nominated show and sold three concepts to a streaming network as well. I got a tip from a working writer that CSUN's film dept had just gotten some kind of $8m influx via donations or something, but that wasn't evident in any part of the program, which was fine. That said, I was really hoping that the CSUN program would provide the networking opportunities and the chances to collaborate with other talented student directors, actors, producers, etc.--and it did not."
Christina Gomez
  • Reviewed: 8/16/2019
  • Degree: Psychology
  • Graduation Year: 2007
"Although it has been over 12 years since I graduated from college, I remember having a positive experience at CSUN. I had great professors that I learned a lot from. I participated in research and research competition with some of my classmates and have gained valuable experience from it."
Mackenzie Morrison
  • Reviewed: 8/12/2019
  • Degree: Psychology
  • Graduation Year: 2018
"California State University is a great school for those who are seeking a good quality education for a lower cost. As I was attending school I was able to get grants to cover my tuition in full since the tuition was so low that was possible. As well as getting federal financial aid, CSUN offers private grants through the university if your grades are high, I believe a 3.5 GPA or higher. When I found out this was provided in my last few years I was amazed because it made it easy for me to pay for school without having to do anything more than getting good grades. Everyone wants to say that a state school does not offer a quality education like USC or UCLA, but I learned that many teachers also teach at those "higher quality" schools meaning you are getting equal education for a lower cost. I was able to graduate in a timely manner and left learning a lot more than when I graduated from high school."
Julia Groman
  • Reviewed: 8/7/2019
  • Degree: History
  • Graduation Year: 2012
"I absolutely loved my experience as a history major at California State University Northridge. I was a transfer student from a junior college, in order to save money because I paid school out of pocket. I highly recommend if people can, in order to save money, they should go to a junior college first and then to a state school. Although I had dreamed of going to huge school like University of California Santa Barbara or University of California Los Angeles, I was very satisfied with my educational experience at Northridge. Northridge is a commuter school, but I made a lot of lasting friends. They do have dorms, but most people commute to school from the surrounding areas. So, if youre from the LA area you will feel right at home. My program was relatively small, so I the classroom experience was far more intimate than the lecture hall style. A typical classroom had fifteen to twenty students, which allowed for a lot more one on one attention by the professors. Also, I had very good relationships with my professors who inspired me. They were all very intelligent thoughtful people who inspired me inside and outside of the classroom. I loved the atmosphere my professors created, many of them held discussion style classes. The library is one of the biggest in the California State systems and had many resources. It was recently renovated within the last five years, and the first floor is very modern in comparison to other school libraries. I got involved in a few honors societies while in attendance there. I truly enjoyed being a history major at California Sate University Northridge."
Briana McDaniel
  • Reviewed: 7/13/2019
  • Degree: Journalism
  • Graduation Year: 2014
"Cal State Northridge is a commuter school. With that in mind, please be prepared to engage with a plethora of colorful individuals. The university offers dozens of activities, clubs and amenities in affords to keep students active on campus. I joined a few clubs which were focused on my major and my heritage. I also joined a sorority on campus and participated in community service projects. While attending CSUN, I double majored in Journalism and in Religious studies. My concentration in the Journalism department was public relations. There were only two professors that taught in my focus, so the classes are very small and you get to engage with the professor better. I recall one of my classes having only 8 students in it. Both professors were still in their respected fields and CEOs of their own companies which motivated me to possible be my own boss one day. The Religious Studies department was also small, which I enjoyed. As it turned out, the RS department had a large minor enrollment but a third of that number were majors. Overall the campus is pretty friendly, the professors are amazing and the food is good. The staff at the student union are amazing as well and very helpful. Before graduating the school opened the new recreation facility, so, if you have a few moments in between classes or on an off day, I recommend going to take a look at what it has to offer. Enroll in a sports club or a fitness class. You wont regret it."
Katia Delgado
  • Reviewed: 6/30/2019
  • Degree: Fitness Trainer
  • Graduation Year: 2017
"California State University-Northridge was a campus full of endless opportunities. The campus was welcoming and the staff approachable. In my department, I was able to have a close engagement with classmates. The classroom size ranged from 30-150 students."
Danielle
  • Reviewed: 3/30/2019
  • Degree: Health Sciences
  • Graduation Year: 2018
"CSUN is an extremely inexpensive school. The college, as a whole, is a good school. There are a lot of student activities, and there are always great concerts and performances going on at the Soroya. However, this is a mediocre school for Commmunication Disorders majors. To begin with, there aren't even advisors once you start taking upper division courses. Furthermore, the major is impacted, so instead of registering for the class you want at the time you wish to take it, the office chooses everyone's courses themselves. You may not get the class you need to graduate or prepare you for grad school. They also don't care about any personal conflicts with time, so you better have a flexible work schedule. They do not send out schedules till 2-3 weeks before school, which is really frustrating and makes it difficult to prepare for the upcoming semester."
Michael Sompura
  • Reviewed: 12/30/2018
  • Degree: Business
  • Graduation Year: 2001
"The academic advisors and faculty at CSU Northridge were really helpful and caring. I regularly met with my academic advisor to ensure I was taking the right courses and meeting the additional requirements for graduation. The faculty was also helpful whenever I had questions and they all made time during their office hours or by email. They were responsive and helped guide me when I wasnt sure which direction in academics I wanted to go. I changed my major from accounting to finance (business administration & finance) after talking with a few professors and working part time for an account and part time for a financial adviser. I took courses at a satellite location for the majority of my requirements and took the required classes at the main campus. The campus was easy to navigate, there was lots of student clubs and networking groups to join, and the alumni association was very helpful after I graduated. The career center was also helpful in helping with my resume and job search. The business administration with an option in finance degree at CSU Northridge was highly regarded by those in the surrounding business community. The curriculum in the finance department was very on par with the real world, as I was working in financial services while going to college. What I learned in school I could immediately apply at work and gave me a better understanding of what I was doing in my day to day work life. I still have some of my textbooks from college and reference them in the financial foundations and principles. Even though it became difficult at times to juggle school and work, I am grateful to all that my college life taught me as a foundation for my future work life."
Michael Sompura
  • Reviewed: 12/30/2018
  • Degree: Business
  • Graduation Year: 2001
"The academic advisors and faculty at CSU Northridge were really helpful and caring. I regularly met with my academic advisor to ensure I was taking the right courses and meeting the additional requirements for graduation. The faculty was also helpful whenever I had questions and they all made time during their office hours or by email. They were responsive and helped guide me when I wasnt sure which direction in academics I wanted to go. I changed my major from accounting to finance (business administration & finance) after talking with a few professors and working part time for an account and part time for a financial adviser. I took courses at a satellite location for the majority of my requirements and took the required classes at the main campus. The campus was easy to navigate, there was lots of student clubs and networking groups to join, and the alumni association was very helpful after I graduated. The career center was also helpful in helping with my resume and job search. The business administration with an option in finance degree at CSU Northridge was highly regarded by those in the surrounding business community. The curriculum in the finance department was very on par with the real world, as I was working in financial services while going to college. What I learned in school I could immediately apply at work and gave me a better understanding of what I was doing in my day to day work life. I still have some of my textbooks from college and reference them in the financial foundations and principles. Even though it became difficult at times to juggle school and work, I am grateful to all that my college life taught me as a foundation for my future work life."