University of St Augustine for Health Sciences Reviews

  • 23 Reviews
  • St. Augustine (FL)
  • Annual Tuition: $15,895
0% of 23 students said this degree improved their career prospects
65% of 23 students said they would recommend this school to others
Start Your Online College Search:

Programs with 5+ Reviews

Student & Graduate Reviews

Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 5/24/2021
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Do not attend the University of St. Augustine unless you have no other option. Even then, you're better off re-applying to other schools. My class and I got completely screwed over by this school. I had 3 months of instruction in person before COVID hit. Of course this is not their fault and understandably, there was a time that the school went virtual. However, from my first term until my last before level II fieldwork, instruction was almost entirely virtual. Aside from ~$160 last summer, we have received NO reimbursement for the resources we were promised yet did not receive. Of course, at the time it was not the fault of the school that we could not benefit from these resources. It is their fault that we were not adequately compensated for it. During the past fall and spring terms, we were able to receive some on campus instruction (about 3 full days of classes per term). Although this was a step in the right direction, resources were still limited. Additionally, the PT students were able to attend classes in person weekly while OT students barely got any hands on experience. It is a requirement for PT accreditation and not OT, but that does not mean that hands on experience is any less important for OT students. Another reason to avoid USAHS at all costs is that they screw you out of fieldwork experience. OT students are supposed to have level I and level II fieldwork to gain real hands on experience outside of the classroom with real people. Instead, level I fieldwork was entirely virtual and we had to perform assessments and treatments that are meant to be hands on in a virtual setting. I appreciate that we had to adapt to the times and that is a skill that was learned. However, this skill is not nearly as valuable as the hands on skills we should have learned. Meanwhile other OT schools have allowed their students to have in person level I experiences. This left my peers and myself completely unprepared for level II fieldwork. My final, and biggest complaint is that we are paying tens of thousands of dollars to attend this school. During level II fieldwork, we are learning from a fieldwork educator NOT professors. There is no reason we should be paying the same tuition during level II fieldwork since the only instruction we are getting is about which forms need to be uploaded when and an assigned discussion board each week. Not worth my tuition. TLDR: you're wasting your time at USAHS."
Stay Away
  • Reviewed: 9/21/2020
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Stay far away from this school! I am grateful for the opportunity to pursue higher education, but there are so many other amazing schools that do not have the glaring issues present at USAHS. This is a money hungry, disorganized, disrespectful, and overpriced school. I deeply regret attending the MOT program and wish so badly I would have chosen to attend a different graduate program. I will be over $100,000 in debt after graduation, the tuition increases every trimester, not every year. The fieldwork process is a complete joke. Faculty, staff, and administration turnover is constant. Courses are never the same, and you are expected to teach yourself nearly all of the material. I am disappointed not only in the way a health care school has handled and informed students of the COVID pandemic, but I am outraged at the way faculty and staff handled all matters of racial justice. This institution only cares about money. Stay far away if you want a quality education and people who care about you. This program is not worth one penny. There are so many other options to become an occupational therapist and help people, it is not worth your mental health, financial well being, and sanity."
RIPhappiness
  • Reviewed: 12/26/2019
"I recommend students to stay away from the Miami campus. The department head and the head of the school are a joke and lack professionalism but yet demand it from students. The campus rules are regulated by the property manager and not the school itself. The people who run the school are very robotic and don't really care about how the students feel. Professors don't answer to emails and the school stretch the professors thin by having them work too many classes. The school loves to hide behind the excuse that they're a hybrid program to use as an excuse when students have a hard time learning the materials and they just refer you to the book instead of taking the time to teach you. The work load is extreme, so make sure you can handle it before jumping in, especially if you don't mind your mental health taking a toll. This school doesn't have a promising student life due to all the regulations set by the school board. Definitely don't recommend this school, but any of the other campuses seem more promising."
OTstudent
  • Reviewed: 6/19/2019
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"I want to begin by expressing my gratitude for the ability to study at an accredited graduate institution and to note that the critiques expressed below are only meant to help others make the best choice for their investment in graduate school. The largest flaw is that the occupational therapy degree program is significantly overpriced. Students pay a considerable amount in tuition, yet are expected to provide required materials such as school polo shirts, goniometers, gait belts, and others out of their own money. Resources in the labs are also inadequate, either in number or quality, meaning that not every student has an equal opportunity to learn during valuable lab time. Moreover, I find it disreputable that students are charged the same exact amount for tuition during the two semesters when they are on fieldwork. Students are not only utilizing far fewer university resources during this time but are also expected to use personal resources for travel and housing in their respective fieldwork locations with no university support. This brings me to fieldwork. I believe the university is poorly connected to fieldwork sites, as it is the only explanation I can gather for the poor system that is currently in place. Students are instructed to prioritize setting and population with disregard for the location or the expense to move to said location, yet they are not even placed in the settings they prioritized. An example is one student was placed in an outpatient and a SNF who aspires to work in pediatrics, while another who prioritized acute and outpatient hands was placed in a pediatric setting for the very same timeframe and city. I have found the clinical education program to be unorganized and significantly understaffed, leading to disillusionment among the very students it seeks to serve. Finally I will address the coursework. First and foremost, my dissatisfaction stems from the constantly changing curriculum. It is to the point that there is no consistency in what is being taught across semesters, let alone the entire degree program. Learning is further stifled when professors are prohibited from discussing missed exam answers. This means we are not able to learn from our mistakes and grow as future clinicians because we lack clarification on what areas of material we have failed to grasp. Additionally, it is my impression that the university moved too quickly to the online learning interface without first working out the flaws. Our online system fails to function properly on a regular basis, leading to frustration among both the students and faculty. This markedly affects the education we receive when class units are out of order, assignments are missing, lecture videos are poor quality, and links fail to work. In addition to this, there is notable faculty turnover that has led to professors being asked to teach any and every course without regard for strengths and areas of specialty. This is unprofessional and does not reflect the caliber expected from a graduate level institution. All of these factors compounded have led to my overall dissatisfaction with the program. I do, however, believe there are many individuals at the university who seek to be catalysts for change and it is my hope that over time they will succeed."
Bailey Shealy
  • Reviewed: 2/14/2018
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is a small two building institution that is perfect for the individual who loves small town universities. While class sizes are considered large for a graduate program, your individual needs are always valued and attended to. The professors are some of the most well-rounded people I have ever met and they truly see you as a future colleague rather than a student. The program itself is challenging as any graduate program should be. But USA offers so many services, such as tutoring or even counseling to ensure that you feel prepared as a future professional. The one thing that I believe sets the University of St. Augustine apart from other Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy programs is the level of stress they put on professionalism. This is an aspect that I think is greatly overlooked when applying to graduate school, but an aspect that is one of the most important as a future professional (in your field of choice). Students graduate with superior reputations and are often times offered jobs before reaching graduation. At the University of St. Augustine, a proper education is guaranteed, and it doesn't hurt to be five minutes from the beach either."
Ta'Niqua Newkirk
  • Reviewed: 3/31/2015
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"I feel very challenged in my own abilities at the University of St Augustine. This makes me feel that when I finish school I will be amongst the top of my peers in the Occupational Therapy field. From the very beginning, this school has reassured me of the love that I may feel for this career field."
Marian Watson
  • Reviewed: 1/17/2015
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"The graduate program offered by the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is accelerated, hands on and exhilarating. I have just started my third term in pursuit of my masters degree in occupational therapy and am excited about the education I am receiving. The professors teaching our classes are all current practitioners, who know about the latest research in the field and keep current with new technology. The only cons to our campus are that the library computers don't function as well as they could, making studying in the library slow and difficult - but I solve this problem by bringing my own laptop to campus to work from. I love how hands on the education is on this campus - occupational therapy students get an opportunity to do fieldwork with local practitioners in a wide array of settings during a few days in every term of school and in our last two terms we are sent to two different settings for twelve weeks each, allowing us an incredible look into the profession we hope to enter into."
Kevin Lopez
  • Reviewed: 12/1/2014
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Pros- Great graduate program. Great teachers. Cons- Not the best facility. Financial aid isn't great. Expensive school. I'm not able to get the assistance needed for school right now."
Jerome Malimban
  • Reviewed: 11/12/2014
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"Pros: Small class size helps with getting quality time with the professors. The surrounding neighborhood feels safe during the day and night. Cons: Cost of living is pretty expensive."
Jerome Malimban
  • Reviewed: 11/12/2014
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"The class size is small and you get a good amount of quality time with the professors. The cons are the cost of living around the area could be expensive. It helps to have a roommate."
Jennifer Brisson
  • Reviewed: 11/23/2013
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"The University of Saint Augustine is a great school with friendly faculty and staff. The program is academically challenging and offers plenty of practical exams to ensure that you graduate as an excellent clinician. But make no mistake, the program is tough because it is accelerated."
Leah Hurst
  • Reviewed: 9/18/2013
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"My graduate program is excellent in manual therapy and to prepare occupational therapy and physical therapy students for clinical experience. The professors are practicing clinicians and it is extremely helpful to have their insight on new and developing treatment techniques and concepts. The school is private and for profit though, and the financial aid and clinical education departments are not very helpful."
Monica Delizo
  • Reviewed: 7/7/2013
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"This school is true to its word on being an accelerated program. However, it feels very rushed and impersonal. Being here has sucked the life out of me and depleted my inner spark. Coming to this school will make even the smartest student feel inadequate and dumb. Not at all what I was hoping for in a graduate program."
Oscar Dayaon
  • Reviewed: 4/27/2013
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Students work hard in the academics in and out of classrooms."
Romalyn Patummas
  • Reviewed: 4/17/2013
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"The physical therapy program has provided me with a wealth of knowledge. The professors and faculty really care about the students and share their clinical application to every topic. The professors are passionate and share their love of the field with students. Although the program is academically challenging and accelerated, the education I have received has given me the foundation and knowlege to become a great physical therapist one day. I highly recommend this program. I am confident that I will be given the tools to continue being a lifelong learner and compassionate and knowledgeable physical therapist in the future."
Andrew Castellano
  • Reviewed: 3/16/2013
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"A graduate school focused on the Health science field of Occupational and Physical therapy which gives students a detailed educational background in the field they will be working in as health professionals."
Amy Kalra
  • Reviewed: 1/20/2013
  • Degree: Health Sciences
"The university offers a great program. Since it is beginning to develop in California, there are still many quirks that occur in the university. Fortunately, the school and staff are very receptive of student feedback. As the program continues, these kinks are being worked out to determine the most efficient method of delivering the education offered at this institution. Many of the courses are taken with occupational therapy and physical therapy students within the same course, so it does facilitate interdisciplinary learning and allows cross-professional relationships to develop."
Giovanna Mauer
  • Reviewed: 1/17/2013
  • Degree: Physical Therapy
"My graduate program is one of the top physical therapy programs in the nation. It is a very reputable school and is centered in the beautiful and oldest city in the United States, St Augustine, FL. The only negative to the school is there is no on campus housing available."
Megan Murphy
  • Reviewed: 1/8/2013
  • Degree: Liberal Studies
"My graduate program is very challenging, and requires a lot of time management and studying. However, the faculty are outstanding and very approachable, and produce a learning environment. The administration continues to work out kinks in the program, but my experience so far has been enjoyable. I wish my program was a little more affordable, but I would recommend to anyone seeking a degree in physical therapy."
Bryce Wong
  • Reviewed: 1/7/2013
  • Degree: Liberal Studies
"Some pros include that it is an accelerated program. We get our Doctorate degree in 7 trimesters, versus the 3 years that it takes most schools. It is also very concentrated, focusing on Health Sciences (mostly PT and OT). The faculty are amazing and always willing to help and meet up if we need explanations. Some cons include that it is a very small campus (California campus). We also do not have any food source on campus."