Willamette University Reviews

  • 29 Reviews
  • Salem (OR)
  • Annual Tuition: $52,290
80% of 29 students said this degree improved their career prospects
90% of 29 students said they would recommend this school to others
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Student & Graduate Reviews

Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 3/5/2022
  • Degree: Political Science
"Willamette University is pathetic excuse of a university. Curriculars, exclusive. Support, lacking. Finance, mute. It’s main motive, money. Its apathetic motto-Not unto ourselves alone are we born- is better read as unto ourselves we are born to conquer. Defaced as pretentious exclusivity and misjudged for virtuous care to others, I would not recommend attending this university. I’ll relate my experience for you to be the judge. The purpose being so that you may make the best choice of post-secondary education. I came to “the school that shall not be named” as an overachiever. To give you an idea, I graduated from high school with a 3.8 GPA(all honors and AP), superb violinist, active church member, and the only scholar to complete two research projects at a renowned IVY league institution, but my only deficiency was being born to parents whose ignorance of a 529 saving plan stemmed from the poverty ridden streets of Mexico. After working three(sometimes four jobs) to finance my associates degree at Chemeketa and OSU, I finally had saved enough to earn a quality education. As a foreshadowing of the institution's ineptitude, and when the time has come to apply, I receive no red berry “Jam”. This was a time when the institution would give jam to newly admitted victims—I mean, indoctrinates. After calling, they told me they hadn’t confirmed my acceptance. I don’t remember if I did, but I’m pretty sure I had given my familiarity with previous acceptance letter confirmation process. I came to orientation professional as always with black pants and a pink shirt and the first comment I get when I enter the room is something along the lines of “don’t you think you overdressed”. “Don’t you think your underdressed”, would have been my response, “because you are attending a prestigious university that should not be taken in vain”. This is the same classmate I would have further one-on-on “discussions” in class. At the end of the day, I didn’t let it bother me since I love this type of conflict—it’s a sort of motivating drug. Yet again, I recognize, although she served as an ambassador for the school, she was not an accurate representation of the institution, so I walked on. Next-up, meeting my advisor. Her lack of experience clearly was confirmed when she told me it was her first year and that she was doing research as a professor. Red flag number two. If you have advisors who lacks experience, kindly request a change—Especially if you are transfer student. You may be missing important bits of information like scholarship and help options. As a transfer student, I felt more prepared than anyone to take on the challenges of this renowned institution given my well-rounded scholastics. But, I was not told, like anything in life, that “the school that shall not be named” purposefully assigns lots of reading to fail you. Let me clarify and reword, they purposefully give you many reading for you to excercise discrimination, learn prioritization, and ask for help. Finally, orientation conclusions. This was the part where they play a video and tell you about college life and how to respond when someone says no to sex. I knew what I was getting into because the group leader(the same girl from orientation who turned out to be our group leader) had warned us, and since OSU played something similar to us. Except this time it wasn’t a “Tea” video, but a play with student portraying the act of sex under the covers(like we don’t see that in movies). During the after discussion, I said something to the effect that I believed the play exacerbated a liberal mindset that our college culture should not emulate since sex before marriage is not okay. The group leader, after some thought, became defensive, as expected, and eloquently defended her position. I don’t remember what I argued, but the effect was that a group member began to cry because she lived in a conservative State where she constantly felt discriminated. I found this pathetic, but I could resonate with her because I myself have felt discriminated for being “too white” when I am a person of color whose loves that I have culture and whose identity lies not in race but faith in Jesus Christ(yet, I did not mention this to the group because I knew my main message would not be heard). Some student at this institution, like me have been shelters all their life, but some have been hurt for their liberal beliefs and feel that it’s okay to disparage on others through eloquence of speech who do not have the same eloquence(and I’m sure it runs on both sides of the political spectrum). I tried to get involved in speech and debate, but I received no response and so was extremely disappointed but relieved. Relieved because I had been told their leader was like Lotso the bear from Toys Story—a despotic dictator who judged your appearance and status without remorse for whatever reason that may be. Disappointed, because, again, I love being in challenging places where I can practice virtue, grace, and the pursuit of truth. I can’t write every instance of diminishing recourse, but one notable one was a discussion in class over global warming. I made the point that although global warming is evident and indisputably true, it would also make sense that the more C02 is produced, the more the earth absorves , and the more green is produced. I made this point to suggest that we should question what we think is true. Isn’t that part of the purpose of college? To create critical thinkers? Wrong I was. Wrong was I. The professor asked: “how many people think global warming is true?” Everyone raised their hand except me because I was in shock that he missed my point. Afterward, some commentary was made that was directed towards my comment. The entire class laughed in mockery. When I was placed on academic probation, the “helper” did not present herself. I missed an important lesson in class that day. I had to take initiative and request that she present herself. I regret to say that I rudely told her: “I’m paying how much money for you not to show up?” I sought help but was directed to a student who only met one class need—not the others. Again, I learnd that no one will tell you were the resources are—not even your advisor. We are paying way to much money to not be told these not so implied important pieces of information. You have to seek them but by the time I learned this lesson, it was too late. I was expelled. After I was expelled, and for good reason, my gift from Willamette was student loan debt and a one credit deficiency to earning a minor that could not be earned(because “the school that shall not be named” does not offer minors without a major). Like a bad break-up, I walked on. It is no wonder why the institution is constantly faced with bad press, demarked with lawsuits, and foreseeable additional suicides. Let the count begin. The best short comments that summarize the institution best are the following: There are many things to love about Willamette's professors and community, but they do not change the fact that the university does NOT care about it's students. In a pandemic, they raised tuition and cut scholarships, while gaslighting students and working families about what they truly need. They care only about money, the trustees, and the alumni (only so that they can keep asking for money the moment we graduate). Especially if you are a person of color or low-income, this environment is not safe for you, as the administration routinely ignores and conceals student appeals for holding racist students accountable. They only take action when it's a mass movement of students and then assign committees that they know will be forgotten about once the students in leadership graduate. Unless their horrible record doesn't bother you, don't give any more money to them." Unnecessarily expensive due to the addition of unneeded administrative positions. Lacking practical application of knowledge taught. Not effectively utilizing school partnerships that are establish(they have a financial engineering program with Columbia University that no one told me about until senior year when I was no longer eligible). The university prides itself on diversity of race/gender/sexual orientation but not thought.” Solution: You can’t criticize without a solution. What the institution should do, since it can’t change the humility of its students nor the receptivity of the administration, it should: 1)create a place for transfer student to commune and seek helpful resources, 2)Tell advisors that if they can’t handle being teachers, doing research, and their life to NOT be advisors. 3)Create a “how to succeed” at this school list and/or list of resources to go for help, 4)Formulize a process for receiving and dealing with complaints, 5)Manage financial investment more wisely(stewardship). Aka. No unnecessary buildings. And perhaps, just maybe, students will have enough gratitude to donate."
Patricia
  • Reviewed: 10/22/2020
  • Degree: Anthropology
"I've had a great experience at Willamette. My classes have been very interesting and I've learned so much, and the professors are incredibly kind and supportive. I've met lifelong friends here, and I so appreciate the sense of community that is in all parts of Willamette. Though Salem isn't my favorite city, there are plenty of things to do, and I really appreciate the proximity to so many experiences in nature."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 9/19/2020
  • Degree: Environmental Science
"There are many things to love about Willamette's professors and community, but they do not change the fact that the university does NOT care about it's students. In a pandemic, they raised tuition and cut scholarships, while gaslighting students and working families about what they truly need. They care only about money, the trustees, and the alumni (only so that they can keep asking for money the moment we graduate). Especially if you are a person of color or low-income, this environment is not safe for you, as the administration routinely ignores and conceals student appeals for holding racist students accountable. They only take action when it's a mass movement of students and then assign committees that they know will be forgotten about once the students in leadership graduate. Unless their horrible record doesn't bother you, don't give any more money to them."
Benjamin Hanks
  • Reviewed: 3/21/2019
  • Degree: Psychology
"If you like the close knit feel that goes along with a small campus this is the college for you. It seems that everyone on campus knows each other. This can be good and bad, for several reasons. If you are interested in making friends and enjoying your college experience and don't mind too much the polarized political climate than you will fit well here. If you are less interested in addressing on a daily basis the grievances against the conservative view point, this school might not fit you well, as this can be taxing on the emotions. The education your going to receive is outstanding. The classes are small and the teachers care about making sure you get every opportunity to achieve in your field. It is fairly expensive because of the small class sizes, but the college has a good record of helping people pay for it if they do not have familial means to do so."
StudiousStudent
  • Reviewed: 3/31/2017
  • Degree: Political Science
"Willamette University is an excellent university to study Political Science at. Across the street from the Oregon State Capital, it offers many opportunities for students to mingle with state senators, house members, and lobbyists. Although it doesn't offer a cheap tuition, the teachers in the Politics department are kind, willing to meet and mentor you through your major and teach you the many aspects of politics, theoretical and realistic."
Emmanuel Rodriguez
  • Reviewed: 3/11/2017
  • Degree: Exercise Science
"Expect to engage with a curriculum and peers that challenge you to think critically. You will learn to harness theoretical and technical concepts and use these to educate, and empower others. The faculty invest in students through personal guidance."
Michaela Freeby
  • Reviewed: 3/2/2017
  • Degree: Biology
"I graduated from Willamette University with a Bachelors degree in Biology. Willamette was the best possible place for me to have pursued an undergraduate education because I gained much more than an education in Biology. My experiences at WU showed me how important all aspects of education are. I learned the subject matter, but I also gained many mentors and cheerleaders in my life. The support that I was shown by my coaches and professors was never-ending. These relationships were more valuable than my study skills, ability to read a scientific article, or ability to do a research project. While all of the other skills that I gained in my field are important, I do not think that I would have been successful without the guidance of my mentors. This insight into education is priceless because it shows the importance of teachers in education. The leadership position that teachers are placed in gives them the opportunity to make a big difference in the lives of their students. It is interesting to reflect back on my experiences in the classroom and think about them from the perspective of the teacher or professor. I am fortunate to have built relationships with many great educators and they have inspired me to pursue my goal of making the difference that they made in my life in the lives of future students."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 5/31/2016
  • Degree: Psychology
"The Willamette Experience was amazing. Classes were small and engaging. Professors were approachable and caring. Campus was compact and beautiful. My time at Willamette prepared me very well for my future graduate studies and career and left me with life-long friends and wonderful memories. I am proud to be a Willamette Alumni."
DG
  • Reviewed: 9/23/2015
  • Degree: Writing
"In general, I loved my college experience, mainly because of the courses I was taking and the friends I made. However, it really didn't seem like I got my money's worth. I don't regret going to Willamette, and I don't wish that I had gone elsewhere, but it sometimes seems like I went to college just to get a degree *somewhere*, because there was almost no help from the staff in my major or at Willamette in general that helped me apply my knowledge to my career goals."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 9/23/2015
  • Degree: Religious Studies
"I loved it- small class sizes, individual attention from professors who cared. gorgeous campus. high academic expectations."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 9/1/2015
  • Degree: Psychology
"Willamette is a fantastic school. I felt very supported by my adviser and the rest of the faculty. I went on to complete a masters degree in public health and felt that I was very prepared for graduate level studies. I use the tools and skills I gained at Willamette on a daily basis and wouldn't trade my experience for anything."
Charlie
  • Reviewed: 8/19/2015
  • Degree: Economics
"Unnecessarily expensive due to the addition of unneeded administrative positions. Lacking practical application of knowledge taught. Not effectively utilizing school partnerships that are establish(they have a financial engineering program with Columbia University that no one told me about until senior year when I was no longer eligible). The university prides itself on diversity of race/gender/sexual orientation but not thought."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 8/4/2015
  • Degree: Philosophy
"Willamette has an excellent academic program coupled with a wide varieties of cocurriculars. It's easy to find a niche or two where you excel."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 8/4/2015
  • Degree: Philosophy
"Willamette has an excellent academic program coupled with a wide varieties of cocurriculars. It's easy to find a niche or two where you excel."
Dani
  • Reviewed: 5/29/2015
  • Degree: Writing
"The campus has a lot of different activities and groups to interact with, and the academics were very solid. In my major, I was not given very much coaching regarding life after college or help finding a job. In general, the career center was fairly useless to me. People are also incredibly engaged in social justice, which can be both a plus and a minus. There is very little diversity in terms of how people think and what kind of people go to Willamette. But it is very easy to find a niche or social group that you fit into."
Lauren Barnes
  • Reviewed: 1/6/2015
  • Degree: Law
"Pros: The program at Willamette is fairly small. This creates a real community in the school. I have heard horror stories from other law schools about such intense competition that other students hide materials in the library in order to gain an advantage. This is not the case at Willamette in my experience. The faculty is also readily available to assist students whenever they have questions or concerns. The Placement Office is also very helpful and works hard to assist students looking for work, whether it is for a clerking position while in school or if it is for a job after graduation. The school is also located across the street from the state capital building, giving the law students great opportunities. Cons: Willamette Law is not very recognizable outside of the Pacific Northwest. This could hinder potential outside of the area because so few know of the program."
Brooke Parker
  • Reviewed: 10/2/2014
  • Degree: MBA
"Small class size with quality professors. Textbooks are included in the tuition price, which helps tremendously with the time to prepare for classes. They are very cognizant of professionals' work/school balance, and the administration is very helpful. The career workshops are useful, and the networking events foster a great community."
Kelsey
  • Reviewed: 8/22/2014
  • Degree: Psychology
"In general, my educational experience was good. I enjoyed my time at Willamette and learned a lot. I think that research opportunities in the psychology department are lacking, or at least not sufficiently publicized to students. If you are proactive and willing to seek out opportunities, it will be a great place to learn and grow. I went to graduate school straight from Willamette, and I felt very well-prepared for that next step."
Colton Theer
  • Reviewed: 8/19/2014
  • Degree: Law
"I have just started the program but I think that the schools attention to detail gives their students the edge they need to be a success. The only cons I can think of are the incredibly high price of tuition and the fact that it is in Salem."
L
  • Reviewed: 8/5/2014
  • Degree: Mathematics
"I had a great experience at Willamette. The professors are kind and very helpful. They truly want you to succeed and are extremely available outside of class. The school has a hearth system where tables are situated near the professors' offices in each department for studying. It is a great system, and creates an environment where the students and professors work very closely. My professors really helped me get where I wanted to be after college, and provided me with many opportunities that helped me achieve my goals. Being a small school, it was also very easy to get involved in research, which was a wonderful experience. Because the school has only undergrads, the students work very closely with the professors in research. This is particularly helpful for those going on to grad school, as research experience is extremely important. The school also has a wonderful community atmosphere, being so small."