University of St Augustine for Health Sciences Reviews of Master's in Occupational Therapy

  • 6 Reviews
  • St. Augustine (FL)
  • Annual Tuition: $17,864
0% of 6 students said this degree improved their career prospects
17% of 6 students said they would recommend this program to others
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Reviews - Master's in Occupational Therapy

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FlexMOTstudentStA
  • Reviewed: 9/19/2021
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Nearly half the class had to retake A&P. This will set you back about 10k. They will place you all over the country for fieldwork. They will tell you it's to give you a diverse learning experience but I would bet my life on the reason being they don't have good connections for placement. The program is extremely disorganized. The technology for online learning is excruciatingly bad. They will not show you your test so you can understand your score. Multiple instructors working on one course across different campuses so your professor is not necessarily teaching you what you need for the test or telling you what to study. Some of the professors are really terrible, actually teaching the wrong procedures. My A&P professor was clearly learning how to instruct on the job as she ketp changing strategy. The administrators are not helpful. Overall, there were a lot of red flags and shadiness and the school is so very expensive. $ is the point of this program. Not prepping students to be good OTs. I would say this school definitely borders on being a scam."
OTstudent
  • Reviewed: 9/9/2021
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"This school has been a complete nightmare and the $100,000+ price tag is an absolute joke. These instructors are lazy, incompetent, and the turnover is insane so there is always a new person in every office so you will never have the information you need. Your "class" is a bunch of online videos, powerpoints, and more powerpoints. Do not expect the small class size to mean that you're free to ask questions, many of these professors are bullies and will do whatever they can to steamroll any questions, usually because they don't know the answer. I have professors who will look you right in the eye and teach you the wrong way to do something. USAHS hires literally anyone because they're desperate to hide the fact that they're a diploma mill. Then fieldwork coordination is quite the experience. They send you hundreds of miles away from your campus (another sign of how clueless and out of touch they are with student's budgets and living situations) as a "requirement" aka they crank out so many unprepared students that they burn bridges with every facility within a 100 mile radius. Our class was expecting our fieldwork locations last summer and the fieldwork coordinators were frantically cold-calling every facility two months past the reveal date to put students in a seat. These people have no idea what they're doing and they think that emailing us to "not discourage prospective students from attending this school" is going to be a proper band-aid for all the corruption in this awful university. DO NOT COME TO ANY (and I mean ANY) ST AUGUSTINE UNIVERSITY UNLESS YOU WANT TO FEEL LIKE YOU WERE SCAMMED OUT OF $100K. Run."
Anonymous
  • Reviewed: 5/24/2021
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Do not attend the University of St. Augustine unless you have no other option. Even then, you're better off re-applying to other schools. My class and I got completely screwed over by this school. I had 3 months of instruction in person before COVID hit. Of course this is not their fault and understandably, there was a time that the school went virtual. However, from my first term until my last before level II fieldwork, instruction was almost entirely virtual. Aside from ~$160 last summer, we have received NO reimbursement for the resources we were promised yet did not receive. Of course, at the time it was not the fault of the school that we could not benefit from these resources. It is their fault that we were not adequately compensated for it. During the past fall and spring terms, we were able to receive some on campus instruction (about 3 full days of classes per term). Although this was a step in the right direction, resources were still limited. Additionally, the PT students were able to attend classes in person weekly while OT students barely got any hands on experience. It is a requirement for PT accreditation and not OT, but that does not mean that hands on experience is any less important for OT students. Another reason to avoid USAHS at all costs is that they screw you out of fieldwork experience. OT students are supposed to have level I and level II fieldwork to gain real hands on experience outside of the classroom with real people. Instead, level I fieldwork was entirely virtual and we had to perform assessments and treatments that are meant to be hands on in a virtual setting. I appreciate that we had to adapt to the times and that is a skill that was learned. However, this skill is not nearly as valuable as the hands on skills we should have learned. Meanwhile other OT schools have allowed their students to have in person level I experiences. This left my peers and myself completely unprepared for level II fieldwork. My final, and biggest complaint is that we are paying tens of thousands of dollars to attend this school. During level II fieldwork, we are learning from a fieldwork educator NOT professors. There is no reason we should be paying the same tuition during level II fieldwork since the only instruction we are getting is about which forms need to be uploaded when and an assigned discussion board each week. Not worth my tuition. TLDR: you're wasting your time at USAHS."
Stay Away
  • Reviewed: 9/21/2020
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"Stay far away from this school! I am grateful for the opportunity to pursue higher education, but there are so many other amazing schools that do not have the glaring issues present at USAHS. This is a money hungry, disorganized, disrespectful, and overpriced school. I deeply regret attending the MOT program and wish so badly I would have chosen to attend a different graduate program. I will be over $100,000 in debt after graduation, the tuition increases every trimester, not every year. The fieldwork process is a complete joke. Faculty, staff, and administration turnover is constant. Courses are never the same, and you are expected to teach yourself nearly all of the material. I am disappointed not only in the way a health care school has handled and informed students of the COVID pandemic, but I am outraged at the way faculty and staff handled all matters of racial justice. This institution only cares about money. Stay far away if you want a quality education and people who care about you. This program is not worth one penny. There are so many other options to become an occupational therapist and help people, it is not worth your mental health, financial well being, and sanity."
OTstudent
  • Reviewed: 6/19/2019
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"I want to begin by expressing my gratitude for the ability to study at an accredited graduate institution and to note that the critiques expressed below are only meant to help others make the best choice for their investment in graduate school. The largest flaw is that the occupational therapy degree program is significantly overpriced. Students pay a considerable amount in tuition, yet are expected to provide required materials such as school polo shirts, goniometers, gait belts, and others out of their own money. Resources in the labs are also inadequate, either in number or quality, meaning that not every student has an equal opportunity to learn during valuable lab time. Moreover, I find it disreputable that students are charged the same exact amount for tuition during the two semesters when they are on fieldwork. Students are not only utilizing far fewer university resources during this time but are also expected to use personal resources for travel and housing in their respective fieldwork locations with no university support. This brings me to fieldwork. I believe the university is poorly connected to fieldwork sites, as it is the only explanation I can gather for the poor system that is currently in place. Students are instructed to prioritize setting and population with disregard for the location or the expense to move to said location, yet they are not even placed in the settings they prioritized. An example is one student was placed in an outpatient and a SNF who aspires to work in pediatrics, while another who prioritized acute and outpatient hands was placed in a pediatric setting for the very same timeframe and city. I have found the clinical education program to be unorganized and significantly understaffed, leading to disillusionment among the very students it seeks to serve. Finally I will address the coursework. First and foremost, my dissatisfaction stems from the constantly changing curriculum. It is to the point that there is no consistency in what is being taught across semesters, let alone the entire degree program. Learning is further stifled when professors are prohibited from discussing missed exam answers. This means we are not able to learn from our mistakes and grow as future clinicians because we lack clarification on what areas of material we have failed to grasp. Additionally, it is my impression that the university moved too quickly to the online learning interface without first working out the flaws. Our online system fails to function properly on a regular basis, leading to frustration among both the students and faculty. This markedly affects the education we receive when class units are out of order, assignments are missing, lecture videos are poor quality, and links fail to work. In addition to this, there is notable faculty turnover that has led to professors being asked to teach any and every course without regard for strengths and areas of specialty. This is unprofessional and does not reflect the caliber expected from a graduate level institution. All of these factors compounded have led to my overall dissatisfaction with the program. I do, however, believe there are many individuals at the university who seek to be catalysts for change and it is my hope that over time they will succeed."
Marian Watson
  • Reviewed: 1/17/2015
  • Degree: Occupational Therapy
"The graduate program offered by the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is accelerated, hands on and exhilarating. I have just started my third term in pursuit of my masters degree in occupational therapy and am excited about the education I am receiving. The professors teaching our classes are all current practitioners, who know about the latest research in the field and keep current with new technology. The only cons to our campus are that the library computers don't function as well as they could, making studying in the library slow and difficult - but I solve this problem by bringing my own laptop to campus to work from. I love how hands on the education is on this campus - occupational therapy students get an opportunity to do fieldwork with local practitioners in a wide array of settings during a few days in every term of school and in our last two terms we are sent to two different settings for twelve weeks each, allowing us an incredible look into the profession we hope to enter into."