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Emory University Reviews

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12 Reviews
92%
Recommend This School
100%
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5 stars
(6)
4 stars
(6)
3 stars
(1)
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5 out of 5
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2009

I cannot say enough positive things about Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. The caliber of instruction was top notch. Professors had a wealth of real-world experience, both at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and well-known organizations. In addition, some professors were well known in their respective fields, creating research and professional opportunities for students. Professors always made time to meet with students, which I have observed is not the case in other institutions. The school environment fosters learning and success. There is a very active student body which is supported by staff and faculty. Students enter the program with a wealth of experience in different areas of public health, which deeply enhanced my learning. Students are not competitive with each other but instead support one another. I made incredible friends during my two years in the program and these relationships and continued to enhance my professional and personal life over the past decade. The location of the school (Atlanta, GA) made for a fantastic academic environment. The school Is located right next to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and many students receive paid or unpaid work opportunities during the program and/or work at the CDC after they finish the program. There are other prominent public health organizations in Atlanta, as well, such as the Carter Center or CARE. While it has changed someone since I was in school Atlanta is still a relatively affordable city compared to other cities where schools of public health are located (e.g., New York City, Boston). My time at Emory University was two of the most enjoyable and formative years of my academic and personal life, and I know I am not alone in appreciating the unique environment it has to offer.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Divinity
Graduation Year: 2011

I attended Emory University Candler School of Theology. After carefully reviewing other Theological Universities, my decision was based on opportunities for financial aid, education, and staff and faculty. Candler School of Theology has a vast variety of Grant opportunities to help alleviate the financial constraint that you have as a student. Staff and faculty are friendly, approachable and willing to help in order to assist you fulfill your educational goals.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General
Graduation Year: 2016

From the moment I began taking classes in the Classics department, I knew I wanted to surround myself with these people for the rest of my college career. My professors were accessible and invested in my studies, as well as my personal well-being. While I know Classics is certainly a niche area of study, I believe my small department represents Emory as school. We are a tight community/family that I couldn't recommend more to a prospective student.

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4 out of 5
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Degree: Nursing
Graduation Year: 2017

The school of nursing is excellent. I have had no problems at all there. It is a well known school in the Atlanta Georgia area. It is expensive so plan accordingly. I earned a post masters certificate from the school of nursing. It was the best experience I have ever had. The teaching here is top notch.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Music Performance, General
Graduation Year: 2015

Education/Curriculum I studied Music Performance at Emory University. Doing so opened up my world to a wealth of experiences, people, and training I never would have received elsewhere. As a liberal arts college, Emory required you to complete coursework besides that in your major, so I was exposed to tons of different topics ranging from chemistry to women and gender studies to business administration. The instructors at Emory are renowned for their accomplishments in their fields, and learning under them made me feel confident in the education I was receiving and a broad perspective of the topics that were taught. At Emory, you see fresh perspectives from your classmates and teachers, and an open community of discourse (especially in the music department, where I had the most experience). The music major required you to do performances each semester and take lessons weekly. Unfortunately, you had to pay for these lessons (not included in the tuition), and I felt it sharply. However, in private lessons I learned the most about performance and music than in any other class or experience, so I do not regret having to pay that cost. The music classes required in the degree are, for the most part, focused on learning the classical history of Western music. It starts getting a little more varied once you have the flexibility to choose courses that interest you, but that is only possible after you have taken survey classes that focus solely on Western music. I would have appreciated a bit more variety even in upper-level classes. The other students you come across in the music department are passionate and diverse. Being a piano performer, I had to put forth a lot of energy to not be isolated (there are not as many ensemble opportunities for piano) and push into the student community. I highly recommend finding people who share your musical interests because it is far too easy to get stuck alone in a practice room. Once you make the initial push, though, it really is worth it, and gives you yet more opportunities to learn about performance and commiserate about all the music you've got to do on top of your regular coursework. Campus Life Emory is gorgeous all year long, so getting outside is so easy, which makes it even easier to get out there and socialize. I will say, though, for introverts it can be really challenging to find a niche without a lot of effort. There are plenty of campus organizations, so I would emphasize the need to really push into those as soon as you possibly can, once you get on campus. Limit yourself to organizations that actually interest you. The tendency is to sign up for everything to spread a wider net, but you will just end up needing to shave down your reach seeing that you don't jive with people in organizations that have no appeal to you. Again, music ensembles are also a great way to get involved and meet people who have like interests, but that's also a legitimate time commitment. Don't commit if you can't! Overall At Emory, the people come from all over, but sometimes I had to do a little digging to find people who are not from the East coast already. The courses and people at Emory provided a really broadly reaching education for myself. The music performance program offered tons of opportunities for education reaching all across different music pursuits, though the department could use more instructors to really open up more education on how modern music and the modern music industry itself works. These are the kinds of things one needs to succeed in the music field. The performance major was much more focused on academic understanding of Western music and its historical evolution, rather than the practical skills one needs to find a job upon exiting the university with a Bachelor's in music. However, overall, I appreciate the experience I had at Emory, and I am grateful that I had the ability to pursue something that I truly care about and has been integral to my life, while also enriching my education with the other courses required of Emory graduates. I had amazing relationships with my classmates and friends. I am still supported by my professors, who continue to be more than willing to write recommendation letters for me and give me advice when needed. I learned a lot under professors who know what they are talking about and make great contributions to the research world. While I was not health-focused while in undergrad, the energy of the health community at Emory continues to impact my decisions. As such a health-driven university, every person at Emory had some type of understanding of the significance of health and the need to solve problems from the root and not treat merely symptoms. This need influenced my decision to pursue a health-related career where I can contribute my understanding of music and mental health, and how the two can be intertwined.

4 out of 5
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Degree: Neurobiology and Neurosciences, Other
Graduation Year: 2017

Emory University is a prestigious university with numerous opportunities to pursue your career goals regardless of your background. However, Emory needs to work on diversifying their faculty which does not accurately mirror the needs of the students.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Mathematics
Graduation Year: 2007

Great community; made some very smart and connected friends who care about the future and care about building long-term relationships. Plus i had an awesome time in college.

3 out of 5
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Degree: Public Health
Graduation Year: 2010

It was a great experience, but sometimes I wish I would have gone somewhere cheaper for my Masters

5 out of 5
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Degree: Neurobiology and Neurosciences, Other
Graduation Year: 2013

I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Emory. The faculty were wonderful and greatly supported my learning, and everyone on campus was beyond friendly. I had a lot of fun with all my classes, research, and extracurriculars throughout undergrad.

5 out of 5
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Degree: Social Sciences
Graduation Year: 2010

It was a very good experience. I met a lot of people who are very different from me and learned just as much from these interactions as I did in the classroom. There are also many opportunities to volunteer, be active, and engage in cultural activities. I actually do use the information I learned in classes in my professional work as well.

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